Since joining QlikTech last year, one of the things I’ve been most impressed with is the passion and excitement QlikView users have for the product. I wrote about this in my first blog post here, and it underlies a core theme that we are seeing in the market: the consumerization of business intelligence stemming from a growing population of empowered consumers within the enterprise.

 

EmpoweredConsumer.png

Earlier this month James Richardson from Gartner published an excellent piece on this topic: The Consumerization of BI Drives Greater Adoption (available here for Gartner subscribers). Reiterating many of the comments I have made in previous posts (here and here), James states that because traditional BI tools are too complex, too rigid and too slow, well below 30% of the potential BI users actually use the technology today.

 

James then lays out three key recommendations for organizations (and BI vendors), drawing from new technologies and models found in the consumer space:

 

  • Usability:  As James points out, consumers today just pick up new technology and use it. They don’t read a user manual for Facebook or Google, and they have come to expect that ease of use from their enterprise software. In fact, according to Gartner “ease of use for end users” is now the most important selection criterion when choosing BI tools. At QlikTech ease of use for business users means the freedom to interact with the data the way your mind works: search, drill anywhere and navigate across data sets. Don’t be constrained by rigid hierarchies and predefined selection options.

 

  • Performance: Google has taught us to expect answers to all our questions in under a second. If it takes more time than that we assume something has gone wrong and we stop and rerun the search. If users are to truly adopt BI, they must get that same performance when querying data. James identifies in-memory processing as a key technology here, but his main point is that quicker is better: by making BI quick, users will ask more questions and test more hypotheses before making a decision.

 

  • Relevance: At a recent Gartner conference, one of the keynote speakers quipped that traditional BI tools have become sophisticated ETL tools for business users: they use them to pull data out of the data warehouse into Excel where they do their real analysis. Part of this is due to the usability issues outlined above, but part of this is because the users have other data they want to combine with the standard corporate data to get a complete picture. As James points out, if the BI platform omits critical information, users won’t use or trust it. Thus, BI platforms need to support data mashups, allowing business users to combine their own data sources without relying on formal data integration.

 

I am certainly seeing the consumerization of BI software in the QlikView customer base and I think James has made some great points about what is necessary to make this happen. What do you think? What will it take for BI to become a daily productivity tool for your business users?

Since joining QlikTech last year, one of the things I’ve been most impressed with is the passion and excitement QlikView users have for the product. I wrote about this in my first blog post here, and it underlies a core theme that we are seeing in the market: the consumerization of business intelligence.

Earlier this month James Richardson from Gartner published an excellent piece on this topic: The Consumerization of BI Drives Greater Adoption (available here for Gartner subscribers). Reiterating many of the comments I have made in previous posts (here and here), James states that because traditional BI tools are too complex, too rigid and too slow, well below 30% of the potential BI users actually use the technology today.

James then lays out three key recommendations for organizations (and BI vendors), drawing from new technologies and models found in the consumer space:

·         Usability:  As James points out, consumers today just pick up new technology and use it. They don’t read a user manual for Facebook or Google, and they have come to expect that ease of use from their enterprise software. In fact, according to Gartner “ease of use for end users” is now the most important selection criterion when choosing BI tools. At QlikTech ease of use for business users means the freedom to interact with the data the way your mind works: search, drill anywhere and navigate across data sets. Don’t be constrained by rigid hierarchies and predefined selection options.

 

·         Performance: Google has taught us to expect answers to all our questions in under a second. If it takes more time than that we assume something has gone wrong and we stop and rerun the search. If users are to truly adopt BI, they must get that same performance when querying data. James identifies in-memory processing as a key technology here, but his main point is that quicker is better: by making BI quick, users will ask more questions and test more hypotheses before making a decision.

 

·         Relevance: At a recent Gartner conference, one of the keynote speakers quipped that traditional BI tools have become sophisticated ETL tools for business users: they use them to pull data out of the data warehouse into Excel where they do their real analysis. Part of this is due to the usability issues outlined above, but part of this is because the users have other data they want to combine with the standard corporate data to get a complete picture. As James points out, if the BI platform omits critical information, users won’t use or trust it. Thus, BI platforms need to support data mashups, allowing business users to combine their own data sources without relying on formal data integration.

 

I am certainly seeing the consumerization of BI software in the QlikView customer base and I think James has made some great points about what is necessary to make this happen. What do you think? What will it take for BI to become a daily productivity tool for your business users?

Since joining QlikTech last year, one of the things I’ve been most impressed with is the passion and excitement QlikView users have for the product. I wrote about this in my first blog post here, and it underlies a core theme that we are seeing in the market: the consumerization of business intelligence.

Earlier this month James Richardson from Gartner published an excellent piece on this topic: The Consumerization of BI Drives Greater Adoption (available here for Gartner subscribers). Reiterating many of the comments I have made in previous posts (here and here), James states that because traditional BI tools are too complex, too rigid and too slow, well below 30% of the potential BI users actually use the technology today.

James then lays out three key recommendations for organizations (and BI vendors), drawing from new technologies and models found in the consumer space:

·         Usability:  As James points out, consumers today just pick up new technology and use it. They don’t read a user manual for Facebook or Google, and they have come to expect that ease of use from their enterprise software. In fact, according to Gartner “ease of use for end users” is now the most important selection criterion when choosing BI tools. At QlikTech ease of use for business users means the freedom to interact with the data the way your mind works: search, drill anywhere and navigate across data sets. Don’t be constrained by rigid hierarchies and predefined selection options.

 

·         Performance: Google has taught us to expect answers to all our questions in under a second. If it takes more time than that we assume something has gone wrong and we stop and rerun the search. If users are to truly adopt BI, they must get that same performance when querying data. James identifies in-memory processing as a key technology here, but his main point is that quicker is better: by making BI quick, users will ask more questions and test more hypotheses before making a decision.

 

·         Relevance: At a recent Gartner conference, one of the keynote speakers quipped that traditional BI tools have become sophisticated ETL tools for business users: they use them to pull data out of the data warehouse into Excel where they do their real analysis. Part of this is due to the usability issues outlined above, but part of this is because the users have other data they want to combine with the standard corporate data to get a complete picture. As James points out, if the BI platform omits critical information, users won’t use or trust it. Thus, BI platforms need to support data mashups, allowing business users to combine their own data sources without relying on formal data integration.

 

I am certainly seeing the consumerization of BI software in the QlikView customer base and I think James has made some great points about what is necessary to make this happen. What do you think? What will it take for BI to become a daily productivity tool for your business users?

Since joining QlikTech last year, one of the things I’ve been most impressed with is the passion and excitement QlikView users have for the product. I wrote about this in my first blog post here, and it underlies a core theme that we are seeing in the market: the consumerization of business intelligence.

Earlier this month James Richardson from Gartner published an excellent piece on this topic: The Consumerization of BI Drives Greater Adoption (available here for Gartner subscribers). Reiterating many of the comments I have made in previous posts (here and here), James states that because traditional BI tools are too complex, too rigid and too slow, well below 30% of the potential BI users actually use the technology today.

James then lays out three key recommendations for organizations (and BI vendors), drawing from new technologies and models found in the consumer space:

·         Usability:  As James points out, consumers today just pick up new technology and use it. They don’t read a user manual for Facebook or Google, and they have come to expect that ease of use from their enterprise software. In fact, according to Gartner “ease of use for end users” is now the most important selection criterion when choosing BI tools. At QlikTech ease of use for business users means the freedom to interact with the data the way your mind works: search, drill anywhere and navigate across data sets. Don’t be constrained by rigid hierarchies and predefined selection options.

 

·         Performance: Google has taught us to expect answers to all our questions in under a second. If it takes more time than that we assume something has gone wrong and we stop and rerun the search. If users are to truly adopt BI, they must get that same performance when querying data. James identifies in-memory processing as a key technology here, but his main point is that quicker is better: by making BI quick, users will ask more questions and test more hypotheses before making a decision.

 

·         Relevance: At a recent Gartner conference, one of the keynote speakers quipped that traditional BI tools have become sophisticated ETL tools for business users: they use them to pull data out of the data warehouse into Excel where they do their real analysis. Part of this is due to the usability issues outlined above, but part of this is because the users have other data they want to combine with the standard corporate data to get a complete picture. As James points out, if the BI platform omits critical information, users won’t use or trust it. Thus, BI platforms need to support data mashups, allowing business users to combine their own data sources without relying on formal data integration.

 

I am certainly seeing the consumerization of BI software in the QlikView customer base and I think James has made some great points about what is necessary to make this happen. What do you think? What will it take for BI to become a daily productivity tool for your business users?