Qlik Community

Blogs

View our Technical Blogs for updates and information.

All about product and Qlik solutions: scripting, data modeling, visual design, extensions, best practices, etc.

Learn about what's new across all of the products in our growing Qlik product portfolio.

Deep dives into specific back-end technologies which allow for the extension of Qlik to fit the needs of the enterprise.

Information on all new product releases, connectors, beta programs, and technical product information.

Updates for Qlik Community offerings, announcements and changes.

Important and useful support information about end-of-product support, new service releases, and general support topics.

This forum was created for professors and students using Qlik within academia.

On this forum you can access and follow the latest updates of our courses and programs with the Qlik Education team.

Recent Blog Posts

  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    QlikView 11 Beta Available

    Today we are unveiling the QlikView 11 Beta program for all customer and partners.  If you are in one of these two groups, you will find a new community has been opened to you - the QlikView 11 Beta Community (check the Places dialog on your QlikCommunity home page). Inside the QlikView 11 Beta Community you will find access to the QlikView 11 software, helpful documents on getting started with the new QlikView 11 features, notices about rel... Show More

    Today we are unveiling the QlikView 11 Beta program for all customer and partners.  If you are in one of these two groups, you will find a new community has been opened to you - the QlikView 11 Beta Community (check the Places dialog on your QlikCommunity home page). community.PNG

    Inside the QlikView 11 Beta Community you will find access to the QlikView 11 software, helpful documents on getting started with the new QlikView 11 features, notices about related events and webinars, and channels to share your thoughts and examples with other community members.  The Beta community is also monitored by QlikTech employees from across a range of disciplines and they will be sharing their thoughts, insights and experiences as well.

    We look forward to hearing from you about your QlikView 11 experiences.

    Regards

    QlikView Products & R&D Teams

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    QlikView 11.20 Service Release 4 Beta is Available

    QlikView Version 11.20 Service Release 4 Beta is available to existing customers and partners.With this release we have improved the following:Shared file stabilization – large amount of fixes to improve stability;Search and Select – fixes to ensure correct and consistent behavior of Search and Select across the product;Calendar object replaced in AJAX – must ensure no backward compatibility problems. You can read all the changes we have made in ... Show More

    QlikView Version 11.20 Service Release 4 Beta is available to existing customers and partners.

    With this release we have improved the following:

      • Shared file stabilization – large amount of fixes to improve stability;
      • Search and Select – fixes to ensure correct and consistent behavior of Search and Select across the product;
      • Calendar object replaced in AJAX – must ensure no backward compatibility problems.

    You can read all the changes we have made in QV11.20 SR4 in the Release Notes attached here.

    We have created a beta community at http://community.qlik.com/community/qlikview_beta_programs under “My Beta Programs” where you can download and test the beta, report bugs, start open discussions and ask questions.

    If you are QlikView customer or partner, you can access the beta community here http://community.qlik.com/community/qlikview_beta_programs/qlikview-11.2-sr4-beta.

    The beta will run until September 19, 2013.

    We look forward to hearing from you!

    Regards,

    The Products Team

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Design Blog

    The coffee analogy of UX design

    This analogy gives an example of what UX design could be. As you know, an analogy is not the complete truth. The personas (Eileen, Linda and Brandon) used in this analogy are just examples and made up by me. Read more about personas and how we use them:The QlikView JourneyPersonas in UX DesignSo maybe you’ve heard of the Kano model which is a theory for user satisfaction..? If not, google it and you’ll find plenty of diagrams. Basically it says t... Show More

    This analogy gives an example of what UX design could be. As you know, an analogy is not the complete truth. The personas (Eileen, Linda and Brandon) used in this analogy are just examples and made up by me. Read more about personas and how we use them:

    The QlikView Journey

    Personas in UX Design

    So maybe you’ve heard of the Kano model which is a theory for user satisfaction..? If not, google it and you’ll find plenty of diagrams. Basically it says that there are some basic needs that our users expect us to meet, but it’s the “exciters” that will make our users truly delighted. The users may not have asked for such “exciters”, but once in their hands they love it.

    When Eileen, Linda and Brandon decide to have a cup of coffee, they probably have the same basic expectations: it should kind of taste like coffee and it should be hot. For Eileen, the taste might not be crucial, all she wants is caffeine and she wants it now. She is happy with instant coffee prepared in her own office. Linda has slightly higher demands; she drinks several cups a day by her desk. She is happy using the coffee machine near her cubicle and she’s perfectly fine with that as long as the machine works.

    Brandon wants his coffee to taste really good. He wants more than the regular coffee provided in the machines. He goes to the local coffee shop at lunch.

    Then one day, Eileen, Linda and Brandon find a new, top-of-the-line coffee maker in their office kitchenette. There is also a coffee grinder and beans. Someone has brewed them fresh coffee with such a fantastic taste that Eileen usually only enjoys at breakfast on Saturday mornings, that Linda did not even knew existed, and that Brandon now has access to in his office.

    For Eileen, it was such a delight that someone had prepared for her what she really wanted and with no extra time or hassle.

    For Linda, it was such a delight to discover what “real” coffee tastes like.

    And for Brandon, it was such a delight to be able to drink really good coffee together with his colleagues. Brandon now brings different kind of beans, so that everybody gets to try different roast flavors. After all, sharing is caring

    So how can this be translated into UX design? Well, first of all, whenever we're designing a QlikView app, a QlikView extension or a new generation of the QlikView platform, we need to accomplish a hygiene level that our users expect. Hygiene features refer to basic operations that the users must be able to do in order to complete their tasks, complying to standard interaction techniques, factors that facilitate learnability etc. If done well, the hygiene features won’t even be noticed because it just works. On the other hand, when poorly done, users will notice them because they cause frustration or dissatisfaction.

    But to offer our users a world class experience, we need to turn our innovation, passion and leading-edge technology into really useful, nifty solutions that will make our users go “wow”! In order to do this, we need to truly understand the driving forces and contexts of our users. So you could say that UX design is about being the users’ advocate, being someone who realizes that Eileen, Linda and Brandon needed a Moccamaster.

    Roasted_coffee_beans.jpg

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    QlikView 11.20 SR3 is now available

    QlikView 11.20 SR3 is now generally available to customers and partners. The software and release notes can be found on the download site (http://global.qlik.com/download). In addition to addressing over 60 bugs, this release brings support for the QlikView OCX plug-in for Windows 8 machines running in 32bit ‘Desktop mode’. For more information about this capability please refer to the Release Notes that are accessible from the download site.http... Show More

    QlikView 11.20 SR3 is now generally available to customers and partners. The software and release notes can be found on the download site (http://global.qlik.com/download).

    In addition to addressing over 60 bugs, this release brings support for the QlikView OCX plug-in for Windows 8 machines running in 32bit ‘Desktop mode’.

    For more information about this capability please refer to the Release Notes that are accessible from the download site.

    http://global.qlik.com/download

    Please report any issues to the QlikTech Support group through the normal channels

    Kind regards,

    The Products Team

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Design Blog

    Mental Models and Usability design

    I recently updated to iOS7….hmm...The new look and feel is certainly delightful, although, one particular thing really got me frustrated. While exploring Apple’s new eye candy, I was trying to delete an email from my phone by the usual way, which is by swiping my thumb from left to right. Obviously, I was expecting a delete button to show up. I tried once, twice and several times, it just wouldn’t do anything and the most frustrating part was tha... Show More

    I recently updated to iOS7….hmm...The new look and feel is certainly delightful, although, one particular thing really got me frustrated. While exploring Apple’s new eye candy, I was trying to delete an email from my phone by the usual way, which is by swiping my thumb from left to right. Obviously, I was expecting a delete button to show up. I tried once, twice and several times, it just wouldn’t do anything and the most frustrating part was that it opened the email instead of deleting it. At this point, I gave up and went into my setting to see if something was turned off…and nothing! Finally I decided to do a web search and AHAA!....They actually switched the whole interaction paradigm of deleting an email from swiping from left to right to now swiping from right to left.

    mental model.jpg

    This was the complete opposite of the model that I had carried in my mind for all these years. This was just a small example of a mismatch in the user’s mental model to the designer’s mental model which caused some degree of frustration and took some time and efforts in figuring out. In this instance, the learning curve was quite low, but what happens when there are so many things in an interface which throw you off because what you expect it to do, is not what it does in reality. This not only causes frustration but a repulsion effect and even the things that work well go un-noticed spoiling the whole experience.

    A designer’s goal should be to keep the learning curve as smooth as possible. This is when the concept of mental models comes into play. A mental model is a person’s perception and an understanding of how something works based on prior knowledge and experience, it is based on beliefs not facts. These mental models are very loose and keep evolving over time; they cannot be visualized and often times aren’t accurate.

    Today, we are constantly surrounded by different systems and interfaces that we have to keep adapting to. Although, these interfaces differ from one another, there are certain design standards that have evolved over time, which they all follow. People form a mental model of how these interfaces work. For example, one of the reasons why we place our Filters on the left side of the sheet in a QlikView application is because we are all used to the web where mostly the navigation panel is always on the left side. Leveraging these already formed mental models in our designs can be very useful in creating a seamless interaction pattern and creating a good user experience.

    However, sometimes, it becomes necessary to challenge the standards in order to keep up with the changing technological landscape. This needs a seamless transition of the already formed mental models to new and evolved paradigms.  As we move slowly into the phase of designing QlikView applications in the 'Next' version, these considerations will become vital to ensure a smooth transition. The below mentioned design considerations can be helpful in achieving this -

    • Providing subtle cues so that users don’t get lost
    • Frequently used functions to be easily accessible
    • Providing certain familiarity aspects in the new design which users can recognize easily
    • Providing flexibility
    • Always providing a feedback from the system to the user

    More information on this topic can be found at http://www.nngroup.com/articles/mental-models/.

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Design Blog

    A short history of Data Visualization & BI

    Modern data visualization and business intelligence has its roots in the very ancient organization methods of information itself. One of the earliest forms of organization was simply drawing lines in the dirt or sand. This gave way to using beans or stones moved around in grooves in the dirt/sand and eventually on stone or wooden boards. This became what we now know as the abacus between 2700–2300 BC with the Sumerians. The abacus was then adopte... Show More

    Modern data visualization and business intelligence has its roots in the very ancient organization methods of information itself. One of the earliest forms of organization was simply drawing lines in the dirt or sand. This gave way to using beans or stones moved around in grooves in the dirt/sand and eventually on stone or wooden boards. This became what we now know as the abacus between 2700–2300 BC with the Sumerians. The abacus was then adopted by cultures all around the Mediterranean. As written languages developed and matured there became written records of information regarding a variety of fields such as commerce, taxation, the sciences, etc. This information remained as written text however. There was no easy way to see trends or outliers in the data collected.

    Data visualization really took off in the 18th century when William Playfair, a Scottish engineer & political economist, brought the intellectual enthusiasm of the Enlightenment to data. Playfair went on to invent the line, bar, pie, and circle charts. Other notable visualizations followed such as Dr. John Snow's 1854 dot distribution map of cholera cases in London, Florence Nightingale's polar area diagram visualizing mortality rates in the field hospitals she managed during the Crimean war, and Charles Minard's 1869 flow map of Napoleon's failed Russian campaign of 1812.

    Fast forward to the 1950s when IBM researcher Hans Peter Luhn coined the term "business intelligence" in his 1958 paper A Business Intelligence System. His work laid the groundwork for modern information sciences. What we largely recognize as modern BI really developed over the years beginning in the 1960s right up through the 1980s. Statistician Francis Anscombe helped demonstrate the value of data visualization in his 1973 Anscombe's quartet which is a series of four datasets with nearly identical properties but look very different when visualized. He was making the point that relying solely on a table of values wasn't enough to fully understand the data. Visualizing the data was crucial to seeing trends and outliers.

    Our modern tools for Business Intelligence have never been more powerful. The challenge of taking action on your data though is largely the same today as it was thousands of years ago. Businesses and individuals are increasingly looking for ways to not only see their data but understand it in ways unimaginable to our ancestors drawing lines in the sand.

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Support Updates Blog

    QlikView Customer Portal login issues - RESOLVED!

    Quick update, all is working fine now!   Thank you for your patience!Dear Customers,We are currently experiencing a technical problem with our login process on the Customer Portal.    We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience.We expect the problem to be resolved by the end of the week.    Until then, if you need to contact us regarding a technical support issue, please do so by email [support@qlik.com] o... Show More

    Quick update, all is working fine now!   Thank you for your patience!

    Dear Customers,

    We are currently experiencing a technical problem with our login process on the Customer Portal.    We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience.

    We expect the problem to be resolved by the end of the week.    Until then, if you need to contact us regarding a technical support issue, please do so by email [support@qlik.com] or telephone.   Contact details can be found here : http://www.qlik.com/services/support/product-support.

    If you have any other questions, please contact Qoncierge http://www.qlik.com/services/support/qoncierge.

    Once again, please accept our apologies.

    regards,

    Global Support

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Support Updates Blog

    QlikView 11.20 SR4 Beta is under way

    Hi QlikView users!We are now entering the final stages of version 11.20 Service Release 4's release cycle.   SR4 contains numerous fixes, including a major change in the handling of .shared files.   The changes should drastically reduce the instances of file locking as well as the chances of corrupt entries in the .shared files.   We would really appreciate your feedback on these changes, and invite you to try 11.20 ... Show More

    Hi QlikView users!

    We are now entering the final stages of version 11.20 Service Release 4's release cycle.   SR4 contains numerous fixes, including a major change in the handling of .shared files.   The changes should drastically reduce the instances of file locking as well as the chances of corrupt entries in the .shared files.   We would really appreciate your feedback on these changes, and invite you to try 11.20 SR4 Beta.   Please note only existing customers and partners with a valid maintenance policy may participate in the Beta program.

    To register and participate in SR4 Beta, send an email to beta@qlik.com to get access to http://community.qlik.com/community/qlikview_beta_programs/qlikview-11.2-sr4-beta.

    View the release notes here: http://community.qlik.com/servlet/JiveServlet/downloadBody/4652-102-2-5607/QlikView%2011%202%20build%2012106%20Beta%20SR4%20Release%20Notes.pdf

    The Beta program runs until 19 September 2013.   Thank you for choosing QlikView!

    regards,

    Global Support Team

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Support Updates Blog

    QlikView 10 End of Support

    Dear QlikView users, please note that this period has now ended and version 10 is no longer supported.If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact the support team.QlikTech will be extending support for QlikView 10 for one additional year to assist customers migrating from QlikView 10 to QlikView 11.2.The current support policy indicates that QlikView 10 support would end in November 2013 – with this announcement, QlikView 10 suppo... Show More

    Dear QlikView users, please note that this period has now ended and version 10 is no longer supported.

    If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact the support team.

    QlikTech will be extending support for QlikView 10 for one additional year to assist customers migrating from QlikView 10 to QlikView 11.2.

    The current support policy indicates that QlikView 10 support would end in November 2013 – with this announcement, QlikView 10 support will be extended until November, 2014.

    We recommend that customers using QlikView 10 plan their migration to QlikView 11.20 as soon as possible to have sufficient time for this upgrade and to take advantage of the numerous business and technical user advantages QlikView 11.2 offers. For help and guidance during your upgrade to version 11.2, see www.qlik.com/services/consulting-services.

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    QlikView iOS version 1.2 Beta Registration is Open

    We will be launching Beta for QlikView iOS version 1.2 in a week. This release, among other things, has improved authentication support with the addition of web ticket and web form authentication methods. You can now choose if the credentials should be re-validated when switching between access points and returning to the application or if the credentials should be used until they are invalidated by the server. This feature can be enable/disable... Show More

    We will be launching Beta for QlikView iOS version 1.2 in a week.

    This release, among other things, has improved authentication support with the addition of web ticket and web form authentication methods. You can now choose if the credentials should be re-validated when switching between access points and returning to the application or if the credentials should be used until they are invalidated by the server. This feature can be enable/disabled in the application settings (Force re-authentication). Moreover, we have improved the handling of document downloads when using a volatile connection. Downloads will now continue after the network has become offline and then comes back online.

    Please note that we have limited seats for this Beta, due to limitations imposed by Apple, so customers and partners who what to take part in the Beta, please express your interest by sending mail to beta@qlik.com indicating that you want to enroll in QlikView iOS version 1.2 Beta.

    We hope to see you on the beta list!

    Regards,

    The Products Team

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Community Manager Blog

    QlikCommunity scheduled downtime and platform refresh this weekend!

    Hello QlikCommunity Members, We are in the final stages of our community platform upgrade. This weekend, we will finalize the upgrade, and QlikCommunity will be unavailable from Friday Aug 16th 5pm PST till Monday Aug 19th. Starting Monday Aug 19th QlikCommunity will have an improved experience including: Improved Forums A new Resources area Revised Navigation Blog Index pageGamificationCustomizable Activity FeedsEnhanced Profile and Self Badging... Show More

    Hello QlikCommunity Members,

    We are in the final stages of our community platform upgrade. This weekend, we will finalize the upgrade, and QlikCommunity will be unavailable from Friday Aug 16th 5pm PST till Monday Aug 19th.

    Starting Monday Aug 19th QlikCommunity will have an improved experience including:

    • Improved Forums
    • A new Resources area
    • Revised Navigation
    • Blog Index page
    • Gamification
    • Customizable Activity Feeds
    • Enhanced Profile and Self Badging

    We apologize for any inconvenience related to the scheduled downtime, and hope you’ll be happy with the improvements to QlikCommunity when the upgraded site is live.

    Please feel free to post your questions, feedback or comments.

    Best Regards

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Support Updates Blog

    Version 11.20 Service Release 3 is now available

    Hi QlikView users!QlikView 11.20 Service Release 3 [SR3], build 11.20.12018 is now available on www.qlik.com/download.   SR3 contains approximately 60 bug fixes, details of which can be found in the attached release notes.Thank you for choosing QlikView!regards,Global Support Team
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    QlikView Expressor 3.10 released - so What's New?

    QlikView Expressor 3.10 is now generally available to customers and partners. The software and release notes can be found on the download site (http://global.qlik.com/download).As we continue our efforts to integrate QlikView Expressor (QVE) with QlikView we’re pleased to announce a feature and maintenance release of QlikView Expressor Desktop 3.10. In addition to over 90 bug fixes and a simple name change, QlikView Expressor Desktop (previously ... Show More

    QlikView Expressor 3.10 is now generally available to customers and partners. The software and release notes can be found on the download site (http://global.qlik.com/download).

    As we continue our efforts to integrate QlikView Expressor (QVE) with QlikView we’re pleased to announce a feature and maintenance release of QlikView Expressor Desktop 3.10. In addition to over 90 bug fixes and a simple name change, QlikView Expressor Desktop (previously QlikView Expressor Studio) introduces MongoDB connectivity, Datascript debugging, a new library of functions and a small set of features that increase productivity. We are always working to make QlikView Expressor more functional and intuitive, and we’re listening. If you have anything you’d like to tell us, don’t hesitate to let us know.

    Please see the PDF attachment at the end of this post for detialed information and supporting resources on these features.

    QlikView Expressor 3.10 Release Highlights

    • NoSQL Connectivity with MongoDB – PLEASE NOTE: This connectivity is available through writing the Datascript synatx. The Datascript language has been extended to include driver integration to MongoDB, a rapidly emerging NoSQL database.

    • Datascript Debugging – It is now possible to attach a Lua debugger, such as Decoda, to a running Expressor Datascript operator. This is a very exciting productivity enhancement for Dataflow developers and developers of Expressor extensions, which are also written in Datascript.

    • The DSEX Lua Library – The Datascript language has been extended with a number of additional system level functions that are especially useful when launching and including child processes to perform data processing within the Dataflow.

    • Deployment Package Publishing – The Expressor Desktop now has the ability to directly “publish” an Expressor Deployment Package to a remote destination, such as the backend server for a QlikView deployment. This eliminates some of the manual work previously needed to perform this task.

    • Copying Project and Libraries – It is now possible to make copies of Expressor Projects and Libraries, making it even easier to create new versions of existing applications and artifacts.

    Kind Regards,

    The Products Team

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Design Blog

    4 tips to start working with QlikView - Developer edition

    My first blog post was about 4 tips to start working with QlikView, the title was right but it was incomplete in a way. I was referring to 4 tips for designers. Koen left a comment pointing that it would be nice to have a version for developers. I agreed, so I contacted Luis Cortizo one of our best consultants, to have a conversation about the most frequently asked questions that came up during the first days of QlikView training. Here are some t... Show More

    My first blog post was about 4 tips to start working with QlikView, the title was right but it was incomplete in a way. I was referring to 4 tips for designers. Koen left a comment pointing that it would be nice to have a version for developers. I agreed, so I contacted Luis Cortizo one of our best consultants, to have a conversation about the most frequently asked questions that came up during the first days of QlikView training. Here are some tips:

    1. Forget everything you knew about data modeling.

    Ok, you don't need to forget everything, but you better be open minded to learn a new way to see and work with your data. There are some SQL modeling rules, constraints and hierarchies that you won't need anymore, QlikView is a lot easier than that. And yes, you will need to learn how to work with the script but trust me, this is about common sense rather than strong data base skills.

    If you are looking at the best way to create your data model, best practices will guide you to Star or Snowflake models. But remember, always start by understanding the business needs, then you will know what tables makes sense to have in your app and how you can join them. By doing that your data model will often look like a star or snowflake.

    2. Practice with your personal data.

    QlikView is probably one of the most comprehensive tools in the data visualization market. It could be used for creating corporate apps with billions of rows of data and thousands of users or it could be used to visualize your personal music library or your file system.

    When starting to create an app, frequently the hardest task will be to understand the business needs, particularly if you are in a complex corporate environment or if you are dealing with incomplete requirements.

    If you are a QlikView novice, my advice is to practice by loading some personal data and by trying to create something with meaning for you, that way you could practice with data modeling and visualization and you will learn how both are related.


    For example, I just moved to the US from Spain so lastly I use Skype to talk with family.  Understand that talking on the telephone is not one of my favorite things to do so, if during the day I have to make several calls, I try to keep the call duration as short as possible. Intuitively I think I should see an inverse correlation in my call history, in other words, the more calls per day the shorter average duration will be.

    To prove my intuition, I just downloaded several CSV files from the Skype website which contained call activity historical data for the last 8 months. Once the data was loaded into the QlikView app, I used a scatter chart to see if I could prove my theory.

    Because real data is (sometimes) ugly I had to transform the call duration from HH:MM:SS to seconds to normalize it and typically I want to work with dates in a human readable format rather than computer timestamps.

    script.JPGThe fact that I had my goal well defined - to show if there´s a correlation or not - helped me to identify what I had to have as an output from my model. In this example I needed to count the number of calls per day and this business requirement forced me to create a new field named "Calls". Later on using an expression like sum(Calls) I could obtain the number of calls per day (or any other dimension).

    Finally and after a few transformations I was able to produce the chart I was looking for:

    correlation.JPG

    Looking at the chart, I can see that there is a non-strong (how close the points are to a straight line) inverse correlation between X and Y axis.  Note: remember that correlation does not imply causation. 

    Unfortunately, the data did not support my hypothesis. I did, however, learn how to show correlation and next time I will need to show how two variables are related I will always remember what I did with my personal data.

    3. Start simple.

    The QlikView approach to app development is based on quick iterations, small steps that put all together will let you build amazing apps. To start working in a new data model, you better start by loading a couple of tables and then create some list boxes with the fields you has just loaded. This will help you to experiment with QlikView Associative experience.

    Green, Gray and White color code will provide you with a great feedback. If everything is working fine, then is time to start with the second phase of your development including a new table or data source, remember that a QlikView app can contain data coming from multiple sources, inside and outside your organization.

    The more time you invest in a good data model the less you will spend on design, that´s the golden rule. And again having well-defined business goals will help you to collect, normalize or denormalize data to specifically respond to that business needs. This for sure will simplify the development process.

    4. Search, copy, reuse… and share.

    QlikView functions set is one of the most powerful data transformation sets in the market, it's important to get familiarized with it, every time you get stacked on how to achieve a complex calculation, use the search function in QlikView Help (F1).

    It’s also crucial to get involved in the QlikView Community - one of the most vibrant websites to discuss about data modelling and visualization - by searching, reading, asking and answering questions, but also by sharing… what makes unique our Community is the ability to share apps and get feedback from other business users.

    Enjoy Qliking!

    AMZ

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    QlikView 11.20 SR2 is now available

    QlikView 11.20 SR2 is now generally available to customers and partners. The software and release notes can be found on the download site (http://global.qlik.com/download). In addition to addressing over 150 bugs, this release adds support for 64-bit versions of Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012. Internet Explorer 10 is now also supported both on Windows 7 and Windows 8 (except for touch usage).In addition SQL Server 2012 and Good Browser from Go... Show More

    QlikView 11.20 SR2 is now generally available to customers and partners. The software and release notes can be found on the download site (http://global.qlik.com/download).

    In addition to addressing over 150 bugs, this release adds support for 64-bit versions of Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012. Internet Explorer 10 is now also supported both on Windows 7 and Windows 8 (except for touch usage).

    In addition SQL Server 2012 and Good Browser from Good Technology are now supported.

    http://global.qlik.com/download

    Please report any issues to the QlikTech Support group through the normal channels

    Kind regards,

    The Products Team

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Design Blog

    Content Organization for better Storytelling in Design

    In a presentation, or a seminar or just a conversation, the speaker starts presenting the topic by introducing the title of the topic, then gives a brief overview, the background and then gently flows into talking about the details of the topic and concludes with the summary or an inference. Similarly, when writing an article, one first starts with an abstract, an introduction, then writes the details of the topic in the body and ends by writing ... Show More

    In a presentation, or a seminar or just a conversation, the speaker starts presenting the topic by introducing the title of the topic, then gives a brief overview, the background and then gently flows into talking about the details of the topic and concludes with the summary or an inference.

    Similarly, when writing an article, one first starts with an abstract, an introduction, then writes the details of the topic in the body and ends by writing a summary or a conclusion.

    Order and organization of information from a reference point to the last detail, in sequence, is the most crucial part of effective and seamless communication and storytelling.

    Design, like writing, or a verbal presentation, or even a casual conversation is a medium of communication and a channel for storytelling. It follows the same principles of hierarchy and order as in any method of communication. Only when information is organized in a good hierarchical manner, the story is told most effectively.

    Most people are visual thinkers, chances of people understanding a set of images and text put together in a grid with no starting or an end point are very slim, instead, going through and comprehending information which is ordered in a top to bottom approach is much more meaningful.

    For instance, the design of a newspaper is a classic example of using hierarchy in the most effective way to help people read highlights and pick information they want to read.  Hierarchical patterns in design can not only aid comprehension but also enable quick scanning of information, guide the user through the story and improve usability. 

    As time becomes an increasingly valuable commodity, grabbing the user’s attention and retaining it has become the most important and the most challenging thing today. Designing information in a way that calls for the user’s attention and retains it is the key to a successful communication strategy and Hierarchy forms one of the most important ingredients for effective communication.

    In a QlikView application the D-A-R concept (Dashboard, analysis, report) is a great method to provide contextual hierarchy where the content is presented in a top down approach. This makes it easier for the user to grasp the data from start to finish and also enables them to pick out information that they intends to drill down to and analyze.

    However basic and overemphasized these principles may seem, the fact is that they always seem to work and give rise to good user experience. Research and usability tests prove that when a design layout adheres to the basic principles of design, the design becomes more user-friendly, simple and obvious. Hierarchy is one of the most important principles of basic design and should be applied to all designs from simple to complex.
    A technical brief can be found here which expands more on this topic.

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    QlikView Connector for use with SAP Netweaver Version 5.8 Update

    QlikView Connector for use with SAP Netweaver 5.80 update is now generally available to customers and partners. The software and release notes can be found on the download site http://global.qlik.com/download.Additions include:Fix for handling delta load packets containing no new rowsThe connect  string in the script now contains the host address and port number for connecting to the QV SAP network service.Kind RegardsThe Products Team
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Design Blog

    Handling many tabs in QlikView

    We sometimes suffer from trying to show as much information as possible in QlikView.  In order for us to categorize the information so the users can consume it more easily and smoothly, the first option you may consider is using tabs.  Tabs are a great way to categorize the information for users; however, if you abuse the tab system in QlikView, users may get confused or miss some important information that is available for them.  ... Show More

    We sometimes suffer from trying to show as much information as possible in QlikView.  In order for us to categorize the information so the users can consume it more easily and smoothly, the first option you may consider is using tabs. 

    Tabs are a great way to categorize the information for users; however, if you abuse the tab system in QlikView, users may get confused or miss some important information that is available for them.  This is why.

    •          When there are too many tabs, then QlikView wraps the tabs and creates multiple rows of tabs in QlikView Desktop.

    Tab1s.png

    •          The point above is a different usability in AJAX client when many tabs exist.  QlikView creates buttons to navigate the rest of the tabs that are hidden, just like MS Excel. As you can imagine, this can be a risk of users missing some information.

    tab2s.png

    Have you seen an application like this?  Well, I have.  Yes, in a real life use case.

    tab3s.png

    In this extreme case, rows of tabs can be as many as the example above.  This is an example with 1024x768 screen resolution.  As you can see, we are losing the real estate for information display for the tabs.  It is about 1/3 of the entire real state for tabs.

    In order to avoid this tab nightmare, you have a few options to overcome this situation.  First, think about the hierarchy of your information categories.  Then, consider using 1) a container object, 2) sub-tabular system, 3) a multi-box or 4) combination of these options. 

    This is one example of using the Option2: sub tabular-system.

    tab4s.png

    If you are curious to know more about this topic, you can see the tech brief here.  More example snapshots and how each option works are documented in detail.

    I hope you have a better understanding on how to deal with many tabs in QlikView.

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Community Manager Blog

    Share QlikViews and QlikView Personal Edition

    NOTE: Files that work with QlikView Personal Edition will have the following in their description:***This application is Personal Edition compatible. ***If you do not see this text, then the file is NOT compatible and will consume one of your four recovery attempts should you try to use it. We are adding PE Compatible files on a rolling basis.One of the best ways to learn about the capabilities of QlikView is through tutorial files, which provide... Show More

    NOTE: Files that work with QlikView Personal Edition will have the following in their description:

    ***This application is Personal Edition compatible. ***

    If you do not see this text, then the file is NOT compatible and will consume one of your four recovery attempts should you try to use it. We are adding PE Compatible files on a rolling basis.

    One of the best ways to learn about the capabilities of QlikView is through tutorial files, which provide helpful hints like expression examples, code blocks and design advice. In addition to the QlikView tutorials installed with the software, the Share QlikViews section of QlikCommunity hosts over 100 sample QlikView applications that have helped our members learn about new, different and even fun uses of QlikView.

    With QlikTech's recent release of QlikView 9 and the advent of the Personal Edition, there is now a new crop of QlikView users joining our community: developers that have an unlimited amount of time to learn, test and create QlikView applications. The one limitation of QlikView Personal Edition is the ability to open QlikView files created by others, which until now prevented these users from downloading and learning from the files in the Share QlikViews section.

    Starting today, we are going to enable QlikView Personal Edition users to download and use files uploaded by our Community to enhance their QlikView skills and knowledge. This will change a couple of processes on the site, but the day-to-day impact will be minimal. These changes include:

    Establishing general guidelines for Share QlikViews files

    We greatly appreciate all of the uploads to the Share QlikViews section over the past few months; our library of files now exceeds 100 files that have been downloaded more than 20,000 times! In order to keep the section as useful and easy-to-navigate as possible, we are going to establish a couple of guidelines for uploads to the Share QlikViews section:

    • Safe - virus-free, no unsafe macros, functioning load script and data model
    • Educational - demonstrates a difficult or complex QlikView functionality (Set Analysis, Google Maps, load script tips and tricks)
    • Useful - serves as a functional QlikView application for day-to-day, personal use (bank account application, contact manager)
    • Fun - using public datasets to create cool QlikView applications (World Cup, Tour de France, World of Warcraft)

    These guidelines are not exhaustive; each file will be reviewed, and if there is any problem, we will contact the author of the file to get it resolved.

    All files uploaded to Share QlikViews will be moderated and modified for QVPE before being published

    All members, including Personal Edition users, can upload apps to the site, and they will be reviewed per the preceding guidelines. Once approved, we will apply a Universal License Key to the file that will allow it to work with Personal Edition.

    Existing Share QlikViews files will be modified to work with Personal Edition

    We will begin adding the key to popular files already in the Share QlikViews section, and will denote the files by adding a "Personal Edition Compatible" tag and headline to each file's description. This process will happen over the next several weeks.

    Thank you again to all of our members that have contributed files up to this point, and we hope that the new Personal Edition audience will encourage more of you to participate!

    --Jason

    Show Less
  • qlik-community-blogs.jpg
    Qlik Design Blog

    Usability Recommendations

    Usability engineers & researchers are crucial parts of User Experience. While not as "glamorous" as designers they bring evidence to the world of design. Through observation of heuristic tests they offer empirical evidence that a design is working, failing, what users like, what users aren't finding, what users are doing that they don't even realize they are doing it, etc. Usability is the closest thing design has to being a science.  Th... Show More

    Usability engineers & researchers are crucial parts of User Experience. While not as "glamorous" as designers they bring evidence to the world of design. Through observation of heuristic tests they offer empirical evidence that a design is working, failing, what users like, what users aren't finding, what users are doing that they don't even realize they are doing it, etc. Usability is the closest thing design has to being a science.

     

    The attached technical paper goes through a variety of topics with usability in mind and makes recommendations. It links out to studies and research already done supporting best practices.

    The basic findings and recommendations in this document are that:

    • People don’t read everything online, they skim

    • Paragraph width impacts comprehension

    • Scrolling is good

    • Monitor Resolution: design for 1024x768

    • Ipads: design for 1024x768 and allow scrolling

    • Icons don’t necessarily help usability

    • Filters should be on the left

    Show Less