Qlik Community

Blogs

Hear directly from Qlik employees in our eight unique blogs. Check out the new Architecture Deep Dive Blog!

Important and useful support information about end-of-product support, new service releases, and general support topics.

Updates for Qlik Community offerings, announcements and changes.

All about product and Qlik solutions: scripting, data modeling, visual design, extensions, best practices, etc.

This forum was created for professors and students using Qlik within academia.

On this forum you can access and follow the latest updates of our courses and programs with the Qlik Education team.

Learn about what's new across all of the products in our growing Qlik product portfolio.

Information on all new product releases, connectors, beta programs, and technical product information.

Deep dives into specific back-end technologies which allow for the extension of Qlik to fit the needs of the enterprise.

All about Qliks Voice of the Customer program and Customer Success initiatives

Recent Blog Posts

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    Qlik Design Blog

    Use of Icons in Design

    Have you ever noticed how information is constantly communicated to you via icons in the world of electronic media?Right from the first screen that appears after you start your computers, tablet or phone to checking your emails and then moving on to surfing the web, you are constantly being informed by these little visuals which help you navigate your way through information and effectively alert you of various situations.Icons are a great way of... Show More

    Have you ever noticed how information is constantly communicated to you via icons in the world of electronic media?

    1.png

    Right from the first screen that appears after you start your computers, tablet or phone to checking your emails and then moving on to surfing the web, you are constantly being informed by these little visuals which help you navigate your way through information and effectively alert you of various situations.Icons are a great way of communicating information quickly and precisely.

    3.pngIf we look at some of the top usability rated websites and applications, we will find that they rely very heavily on the use of icons to facilitate excellent user experience. For instance, Dropbox uses icons for almost every function which not only makes it quick to grasp but also makes it visually appealing.In our case as QlikView application designers, we need to consider the use of icons as a way to draw the users’ attention, to alert them of a situation or to alarm them of an impending.  Also icons can be used very effectively to display priorities for KPIs which can be used in combination with the traffic light chart (Red, yellow, green). 4.png

    The other part to the story is that the use of icons has become very popular in the industry today, especially the web world, so people tend to associate certain actions to certain icons. In our case, while designing application, it becomes important to consider the fact that the users’ psychological paradigm works in alignment to the surfing the web when trying to work with an application. They try to find similarities between using a website and using an application. So, the use of icons becomes all the more relevant in designing applications for us.

    So, what are some of the reasons that can justify why icons can be effective in designs? There are a few:-

    •Effective visual communication
    •Easy identification of information
    •Draw users’ attention and alert them of a given situation – this is especially important in dashboards
    •To provide a visual relief and enhance visual display of information
    •To save screen real estate by replacing text with icons

    Although icons can be a great way of conveying an idea, their use, in design can be slightly tricky. There are a few dos and don’ts that one needs to keep in mind when incorporating icons in design.  That said, Icons can enhance the look and feel of a design and at the same time can enhance the readability of content and thus the usability of an application.

    A detailed description with examples of best practices of using icons can be found in the technical brief here.

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    Qlik Support Updates Blog

    Do we support Windows 8 and IE10 yet?

    Hi everyone,We are currently in the process of testing version 11.2 with Windows 8, 2012 Server and also Internet Explorer 10 with a view to introducing support (which may be limited) for the above in a future 11.2 Service Release.    Retrospective support in version 10 and already released v11 Service Releases will not be added.We would advise users of Windows 7 not to upgrade their Internet Explorer browser to IE10 at this time.   Be aware that... Show More

    Hi everyone,

    We are currently in the process of testing version 11.2 with Windows 8, 2012 Server and also Internet Explorer 10 with a view to introducing support (which may be limited) for the above in a future 11.2 Service Release.    Retrospective support in version 10 and already released v11 Service Releases will not be added.

    We would advise users of Windows 7 not to upgrade their Internet Explorer browser to IE10 at this time.   Be aware that Windows Update may automatically install IE10.   Some known issues with IE10 include (use as a guide only, not an exhaustive list):

    • Color gradients in captions/backgrounds not working
    • Unable to move columns in table boxes
    • Scrolling issues in table boxes
    • QMC task creation dialogs not working correctly
    • WebParts do not work correctly

    regards,

    Global Support

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    Qlik Support Updates Blog

    QlikView 11.20 Service Release 1 is now available - UPDATED

    Hi everyone,We are pleased to announce that QlikView 11.20 Service Release 1 is now available for download on http://www.qlik.com/download.11.20 SR1 contains many fixes, details of which can be found in the attached release notes.Thank you to all our customers and partners who participated in the beta program, we really appreciate your input!UPDATE: The initial 11.20 SR1 build , 11.20.11716 has been replaced by a new build, 11.20.11718.   There a... Show More

    Hi everyone,

    We are pleased to announce that QlikView 11.20 Service Release 1 is now available for download on http://www.qlik.com/download.

    11.20 SR1 contains many fixes, details of which can be found in the attached release notes.

    Thank you to all our customers and partners who participated in the beta program, we really appreciate your input!

    UPDATE: The initial 11.20 SR1 build , 11.20.11716 has been replaced by a new build, 11.20.11718.   There are two reasons for this new build

    • Build numbers in the pdf documentation did not match the actual build number (11.20.11715 instead of 11.20.11716)
    • Reported bug 58950 with increased memory usage during reloads for specific script  field concatenation has been fixed.    If a document script had many field concatenations such as Field1 & Field2 & Field3 & Field4 & Field5 & Field6 as NewFieldName, you may have seen an increase in memory usage during document reloads.

    If you have used 11.20.11716 without any evidence of memory increase during reloads then it is not necessary to install the new build.   We apologize for any inconvenience.

    regards,

    Global Support

    Note:  In line with QlikView's maintenance policy and published release management policy, support for version 10 ends at the end of November 2013.  A separate post will follow shortly.

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    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    QlikView Version 11.2 Service Release 1 Beta Now Available

    QlikView Version 11.2 Service Release 1 Beta is now available to all QlikView customers and partners. This beta Service Release 1 contains around 200 customer reported bug fixes plus fixes for additional internally detected bugs. We have created a beta community, http://community.qlik.com/community/qv11.2sr1beta, from where you can download and test the beta, report bugs, start open discussions and ask questions. Your participation is of crucial ... Show More

    QlikView Version 11.2 Service Release 1 Beta is now available to all QlikView customers and partners. This beta Service Release 1 contains around 200 customer reported bug fixes plus fixes for additional internally detected bugs.

    We have created a beta community, http://community.qlik.com/community/qv11.2sr1beta, from where you can download and test the beta, report bugs, start open discussions and ask questions. Your participation is of crucial importance to us to ensure we continue developing and deploying the highest quality products possible.

    If you are QlikView customer or partner, you will find the QlikView 11.2 SR1 Beta community listed on the Communities Index Page.

    The beta will run until February 20th, 2013. We kindly ask you to provide your feedback until then.


    We look forward to hearing from you!

    Regards,

    The Products Team

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    Qlik Community Manager Blog

    Check out the QlikView Unleashed Comic Book

    Have you seen our new comic book? It’s a super entertaining look at how QlikView empowers IT to deliver self-service Business Intelligence to business users. If not please take a moment to read QlikView Unleashed- a Business Discovery Odyssey where IT helps users conquer business challenges. Please tell us who your favorite character is or if you have an idea for our next comic book installment.
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    Qlik Design Blog

    Personas in UX Design

    When UX professionals get together to redesign a service or product a common practice they will employ will be the use of personas. Personas are representations of different kinds of people / users of the thing you are redesigning. They are the archetypal kinds of people using the thing you are looking to improve. They are the novices, the savvy experts, the casual users, the die-hard fans, the skeptics, etc. You give them names, you describe wha... Show More

    When UX professionals get together to redesign a service or product a common practice they will employ will be the use of personas. Personas are representations of different kinds of people / users of the thing you are redesigning. They are the archetypal kinds of people using the thing you are looking to improve. They are the novices, the savvy experts, the casual users, the die-hard fans, the skeptics, etc. You give them names, you describe what their current needs are, how they use the product today, as well as their expectations for the future.

    While you can't please all the people all the time, this exercise forces you to account for a variety of users and to remember that you are designing for a variety of needs and expectations and not just your own. It pushes you to step outside of yourself. Personas have the added benefit of putting a face to a series of requirements. It helps everyone involved keep organized by having a name to go with a list of features & requirements.

    So where to begin?

    You can start a few ways. If you have the luxury of time & access you can interview stakeholders in the project from a variety of levels. From the hands-off to the hands-on users, from the executives down, you will gain insights from people all along the way. If you don't have that sort of time, brainstorm the kinds of users you are designing for. What will the executive level user want or do with your application? What about the person who is doing the day-to-day maintenance of the app? Create lists of the kinds of users, how they are doing things today, what they want in a future design, what their roll will be, their level of technical sophistication, etc. From here you can begin to design for a variety of consumers.

    A word of caution.

    Personas aren't real people. It seems obvious but it is worth mentioning. Personas are a great way to get organized and remember to account for a variety of users but they aren't the same as actually testing your design with real people. You should still validate your ideas with a variety of people and see what's working and what isn't. A persona will guide you to a solution but you still need to confirm, with real people, if that solution works.

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    Qlik Design Blog

    4 tips to start working with QlikView

    A few weeks ago a former colleague, who has recently started to work with QlikView, contacted me and was wondering how to start with QlikView and how to help his team to better visualize data, here are some tips I shared with him that could help you to start too: 1 Find inspiration and reuseMake sure you visit QlikView Demo site prior to starting your project. One of the best things about the site is the fact that you are able to download one app... Show More

    A few weeks ago a former colleague, who has recently started to work with QlikView, contacted me and was wondering how to start with QlikView and how to help his team to better visualize data, here are some tips I shared with him that could help you to start too:

    1 Find inspiration and reuse

    QlikView Image Gallery demo

    Make sure you visit QlikView Demo site prior to starting your project. One of the best things about the site is the fact that you are able to download one app and reuse the content for your own. Don’t forget to check the brand new demo image gallery with visualization highlights and samples of QlikView’s unique approach to data viz.

    If you need advice on when to use which chart, take a look at Data Visualization App, it has specific information and best practices on how to show your data in the most effective ways.

    2 Identify the needs

    You need to understand the business process that is behind the analysis first. The more you know about the business needs the more easily you will be able to design for the business by choosing the appropriate KPIs. So your first task is to identify the KPIs for your new dashboard and assign them a relative weight so later on you will be able to use hierarchy to emphasize the heaviest, most important ones - this is key.

    penandpaper.jpg

    3 Use pen and paper

    To create a QlikView app start by picking a piece of paper and your favorite pencil and drawing your best approach to the dashboard, you don’t need to be very specific, just sketch it out and create the basic layout to emphasize the main KPIs and comparisons that are need in your project. Don’t forget to validate your design with other users and add their feedback to your design.

    4 Choose a leitmotiv

    Think of the fashion designers. They base their collections on a certain decade or style and then they are consistent in applying that style to the entire collection.  When working with QlikView you can be a fashion designer in a way, choose a theme, your leitmotiv for the app, and keep it in mind when creating charts and when choosing the color palette. Despite using your corporate branding, it could be a mess if you mix several colors, just keep neutral colors for backgrounds and main elements and use contrast to emphasize the most important KPIs.

    Some good examples of thematic design could be founded in QlikView Developer Toolkit App, an excellent starting point for your next QlikView App, you will also find many design elements as buttons, grids, shadows and rulers and lines.

    These are just some basic tips to start working with QlikView but if you want to go further in the design process to developing QlikView applications, then you should review Michael’s technical papers you will find at the bottom of his post called How To Improve Your Design Process Working With Qlikview.

    Enjoy Qliking!

    Arturo Muñoz

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    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    FAQ: QlikView Extension for Salesforce Chatter

    Last updated June 11, 2012. Q: What is the QlikView extension for Chatter?A: In August 2011 we announced that we built a prototype QlikView extension for Salesforce Chatter (see press release). To build this extension we worked with a partner, Centerstance Inc. With this prototype we showed that it is possible for QlikView users to benefit from Chatter’s social collaboration, and Chatter users to have visibility to insights discovered in QlikView... Show More

    Last updated June 11, 2012.

    Q: What is the QlikView extension for Chatter?

    A: In August 2011 we announced that we built a prototype QlikView extension for Salesforce Chatter (see press release). To build this extension we worked with a partner, Centerstance Inc. With this prototype we showed that it is possible for QlikView users to benefit from Chatter’s social collaboration, and Chatter users to have visibility to insights discovered in QlikView. We are currently working on moving this extension from prototype into production.

    Q: I am a QlikTech customer who is using Salesforce.com and I’d like to get started on using this extension. How much does it cost and how do I begin?

    A: We have not yet decided if or how we will make a QlikView extension for Chatter available to customers and partners. The extension we created in fall 2011 was a prototype.

    Q: What are the key capabilities of the QlikView extension for Chatter? What does the extension look and feel like?

    A: With this extension, QlikView and Chatter users can ask and answer questions related to QlikView apps and the data within them—in the context of QlikView, or the context of the Chatter web application. In QlikView, a user can create bookmarks, which preserve the state (the selections the user has made) of the application. When another user clicks on those bookmarks—either in the QlikView extension or the Chatter web application—they are taken to that state of the QlikView app. The Chatter discussion is visible and accessible to the user directly within the context of QlikView. See screen shots below and check out this one-minute video showing the QlikView extension for Chatter.

    Chatter integration snapshot.png

      Screen shot showing Chatter group w QV bookmarks.JPG

    Q: What “glue code” is needed on the back end to get QlikView working securely with our Salesforce organization?

    A: The QlikView extension for Chatter requires that a server-side component for authentication support be installed on the QlikView Server. This component currently requires that Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS) be installed on the same machine as the QlikView Server.

    Q: How much work is required to get the extension up and running? How long will it take?

    A: A customer running QlikView and Salesforce should expect the installation of a QlikView extension for Chatter to be fairly straightforward.

    Q: Does this announcement mean that QlikTech is focusing on partnerships rather than continuing to build out the social and collaboration capabilities of QlikView?

    A: No. QlikTech takes a two-pronged approach to social Business Discovery. We provide social and collaboration capabilities as part of QlikView for customers that want to deliver this functionality to users in the context of their decision apps. And we integrate with enterprise social and collaboration platforms for customers that have already made investments in collaboration tools. An example of this is that we provide the AccessPoint portal for customers that want an integrated portal where users can find and access the apps they have security rights to access, and we also provide integration with Microsoft SharePoint for customers that would rather use that. You can expect to see QlikTech continue to build out QlikView’s native social and collaboration capabilities and at the same time integrate with an ever-broader range of enterprise social and collaboration platforms. For more information, please see these related resources:

    Q: What are some examples of how customers could use a QlikView extension for Chatter?

    A: A QlikView extension for Chatter is useful during all phases of the QlikView app lifecycle. In the early phases while a team of business users, power users, data wranglers, or developers is creating and refining a QlikView app, they can use the Chatter extension to discuss the app’s behavior, the data, desired capabilities, changes needed, etc. Then when the app is considered “production ready” and deployed to a broader set of people, users can then use Chatter to communicate their questions, answers, and observations about the data and the insights they are gleaning from the QlikView app. Any QlikView app can benefit from this added social capability.

    Q: How many customers are using the QlikView extension for Salesforce chatter today?

    A: The QlikView extension for Chatter is a prototype; we do not have customers using it.

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    Qlik Design Blog

    The Importance of Data Visualization

    In 1973 English statistician Francis Anscombe published the paper Graphs in Statistical Analysis to stress the importance of data visualization. He wanted to show that graphs are essential to good statistical analysis. Commonly referred to as Anscombe's Quartet, he created four data sets of x & y coordinates whose statistical properties of mean, variance, etc. are nearly identical. He then graphed these data sets as four scatter plot charts and d... Show More

    In 1973 English statistician Francis Anscombe published the paper Graphs in Statistical Analysis to stress the importance of data visualization. He wanted to show that graphs are essential to good statistical analysis. Commonly referred to as Anscombe's Quartet, he created four data sets of x & y coordinates whose statistical properties of mean, variance, etc. are nearly identical. He then graphed these data sets as four scatter plot charts and demonstrated just how different the data sets really were.

    anscombes_quartet.jpg

    These charts are an integral part of comprehending the data because we can instantaneously see the differences between the scatter plots, a task that would take much longer if we were to rely solely on the data table. The chart and the table are working together to give us the complete story. Anscombe's point was that the chart isn't subordinate to the data table. Both the data table and the chart help the reader understand the data but in different ways.

    Good data visualization works because our brains are hardwired to rapidly process visual stimuli using very little conscious effort. Even before actively reading the charts your brain has pre-attentively processed the information to spot the patterns, the similarities and the differences.

    So when planning your application consider tables AND charts rather than tables OR charts. They are two ways to learn the complete story in the data.

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    Qlik Design Blog

    Metadata Management the Customer’s Way - Part 2: The Solution

    RecapIn my last article Metadata Management the Customer’s Way – Part 1, I covered a customer’s specific metadata challenge and proposed a QlikView Expressor (QVE) solution to address it. To summarize, our customer needed to know which existing QlikView applications (.qvw)  were in compliance with the newly established rules appointed by the organization’s Business Intelligence Competency Center. This article and companion video (below) will prov... Show More

    Recap

    In my last article Metadata Management the Customer’s Way – Part 1, I covered a customer’s specific metadata challenge and proposed a QlikView Expressor (QVE) solution to address it. To summarize, our customer needed to know which existing QlikView applications (.qvw)  were in compliance with the newly established rules appointed by the organization’s Business Intelligence Competency Center.

    This article and companion video (below) will provide some details about the proposed solution along with QlikView and QlikView Expressor samples. (attached in this post)sheet1.png

    We know from the previous article that the customer’s metadata, such as column labels and validation flags, are stored within database tables as part of their metadata management application. For simplicity I will use an Excel spreadsheet to simulate the customer’s metadata repository and focus on the two fields “ColumnName” and “Validated”.

    Leveraging the QlikView Governance Dashboard

    I've implemented this solution using data files produced by the QlikView Governance Dashboard (QVGD) scanning process and a QlikView Expressor Dataflow.  The QVGD working data files (*.qvx) contain QlikView deployment metadata such as column labels, expressions and field names. Typically, this metadata creates the associative data model read by the QVGD’s information sheets. Leveraging these data files with QVE’s QlikView Read operator provides significant advantages when developing custom QlikView Metadata Management solutions such as this. Since we already have the data files from the QVGD scan, there’s no need to create a custom program to extract QlikView label metadata from the QlikView applications.

    The QlikView Expressor Solution

    Using the QlikView Expressor Design Studio a multi-step Dataflow can be created that will:

    1. Extract and load the custom metadata into a QVE Lookup table for later processing
    2. Read and join the appropriate QVGD data files on their appropriate keys
    3. “Lookup” what labels have been validated or not
    4. Provide appropriate business terms to all validated, non-validated and missing labels
    5. Capture the labels that are not in the custom metadata repository and write them back to the repository for later approval
    6. Write the results to a new QlikView data file to be used for analysis in QlikView

    flow1.png

    Fig. 1 - QlikView Expressor Dataflow that prepares the data for QlikView analysis and updates the metadata repository

    qv1.png

    Fig. 2 - Simple QlikView application used to analyze the compliance of the lables used in existing QlikView applications

    Review the below video (full screen 480p or higher) to learn more and see the solution in action:

    If the video does not display - please use this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IADq2IT1U6Y

    Regards,

    Michael Tarallo

    Senior Product Marketing Manager
    QlikView and QlikView Expressor

    @mtarallo

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    Qlik Design Blog

    A Historical Odyssey: QlikView 6 and Multi-threading

    Although QlikView 5 was a stable, good version with lots of functionality, it wasn’t good enough for the new hardware that came along. We had already seen the arrival of the 64-bit Itanium processor and we had responded by developing an Itanium edition. So far, so good. But when we experimented with large data amounts, we realized that although QlikView now could load and address very large amounts of data, QlikView couldn’t process the data fast... Show More

    Although QlikView 5 was a stable, good version with lots of functionality, it wasn’t good enough for the new hardware that came along. We had already seen the arrival of the 64-bit Itanium processor and we had responded by developing an Itanium edition. So far, so good. But when we experimented with large data amounts, we realized that although QlikView now could load and address very large amounts of data, QlikView couldn’t process the data fast enough. QlikView needed more processor power.  The amount of memory was no longer the limiting factor – instead it was the processor power.

     

    QV06 Opening screen.png

     

    About this time, Intel had just launched its first dual core processors. There were already multi-processor motherboards, but the dual core processors were cheaper and could in addition share cache.  The introduction of the dual core processors and QlikView’s need for more processor power forced us to look at how we better could utilize parallel processing.

     

    Hence: Time for a re-write! Multi-threading – here we come.

     

    Already in the QlikView 5 server, there was some basic multi-threading: Each session was evaluated in its own thread. But now, we needed to take multi-threading several steps further; we needed to make the evaluation of every click multi-threaded.

     

    Multi-threading is not easy. The software process needs to have mechanisms that can determine that one thread should be split into several, and other mechanisms that merge several threads into one. The threads are asynchronous and sometimes a thread needs to stop and wait for the result of another thread. This means that you can get situations where two threads wait for each other. So you also need mechanisms to avoid such deadlocks.

     

    Anyway, we re-wrote large parts of the code and when we released QlikView 6 in the spring of 2003, it was multi-threaded.

     

    In the solution, the logical inference for a single click is multi threaded and the evaluation of several threads are merged together to form the final result. After the logical inference, the sheet objects need to be calculated. Each object is then a thread of its own that subscribe to all changes in the data model. “Subscribe” means that it is re-evaluated every time there is a change in the selection state. In addition, the chart engine is multi threaded, so that if an aggregation is made over a table with a large number of records, different parts of the table are aggregated in different threads.

     

    QV06 Multi threading 75.png

     

    QlikView 6 also brought the LEF files, which enabled Client Access Licenses (CALs) for the server. It also brought the qvp protocol, the plug-in client, the OCX, the table viewer, copy and paste objects, the layout themes, semi transparency (GDI+), the color functions, variables in the layout, the grid chart, the gauge chart, the radar chart, the slider object and the language dll:s.

     

    We also introduced different license levels for the stand-alone version of QlikView 6: Enterprise, Professional and Analyzer, so that a customer could have different capabilities for developers, power users and standard users.

     

    QlikView 6 should be remembered for bringing the multi-threading that we use still today. This is the core of the modern QlikView that can use the power of today's multi-core hardware.

     

    HIC

     

    Further reading on the Qlik history:

    A Historical Odyssey: QlikView 5 and the Rainbow Border

    A Historical Odyssey: QlikView 7, QVD files and the Aggr() function

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    Qlik Design Blog

    Wildcard data loading (*.blah......)

    Regularly in a QlikView application, you need to load from a directory or set of identical files which simply have different file names but contain the same type of data. For example, log files generated by systems contain the same type of data in a set structure, but the filenames often reflect the time and date or the system the log file was generated from.In this blog, I will show you how to (really simply) load in to QlikView, a set of files ... Show More

    Regularly in a QlikView application, you need to load from a directory or set of identical files which simply have different file names but contain the same type of data. For example, log files generated by systems contain the same type of data in a set structure, but the filenames often reflect the time and date or the system the log file was generated from.

    In this blog, I will show you how to (really simply) load in to QlikView, a set of files that are identical in makeup but are not named the same.

    So, imagine we have a directory full of log files on your server as below...filelist.JPG

    I need to load all of these log files in to my application, but I do not want a single load statement in my script for each of the 100+ files. So, firstly we need to perform a standard load from our table (.log) files. When you have done this using the qlikview script editor, you will have a simple load statement...

    LOAD Sequence#,
         Timestamp,
         Level,
         Hostname,
         Logger,
         Thread,
         Id,
         User,
         Exe_Type
    FROM
    [vm-qvs12__Application_QVS_2012-12-04T13.25.38Z.log]
    (txt, codepage is 1252, embedded labels, delimiter is '\t', msq);

    So this statement would load all of the columns listed from the specific file in the FROM statement. However, we want to utilise one single LOAD statement for all of our log files. By simply changing the filename to contain an asterisk, provided all of the columns that you are placing in your load statement exist in all of your files, using an asterisk will cycle through all of the .log files that start with the text "vm-qvs12__Application_QVS_" in the directory, and load the data in to your application.

    example:

    FROM
    [files\Log\QlikViewServer\vm-qvs12__Application_QVS_*.log]
    (txt, codepage is 1252, embedded labels, delimiter is '\t', msq);

    Now we have all of the data in our application, we may want to know from which log file the data in the application came from. So, we can use some functions to give us some extra data.

    We can use the Filebasename() function to give us a column in the data that contains the filename of the loaded log file.

    LOAD filebasename() as SourceFilename,
         Sequence#,
         Timestamp,
         Level,
         Hostname,
         Logger,
         Thread,
         Id,
         User,
         Exe_Type
    FROM
    [files\Log\QlikViewServer\vm-qvs12__Application_QVS_*.log]
    (txt, codepage is 1252, embedded labels, delimiter is '\t', msq);

    Now, that was a simple example of the wildcard load. What if I wanted to load data from multiple files and enhance the script with something like a preceding load? To do this I would have to utilise a simple function/variable and a small loop. In the example below, you can see that I am loading from multiple xlsx files, again using the filebasename function, but I am also creating a column called Total in my preceding load. The For Each and Next keywords tell QlikView to loop through the files in the location that conform to the wildcard in the Filelist function.

    For each vFile in FileList('C:\Users\aby\Desktop\*wildcard.xlsx')

    Load Col2+Col3 as Total,
         *;
    Load *,
         Filebasename() as Source

    from [$(vFile)]
    (ooxml, embedded labels, table is Sheet1);

    Next vFile

    Hopefully I have managed to simplify some of the scripts you use today!

    ABY

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    Qlik Design Blog

    QlikView 11.2 is available!

    Yesterday we announced QlikView 11.2. The main new feature in this release is QlikView Direct Discovery. With this exciting feature, QlikView does not require loading all data into the QlikView in-memory engine anymore. QlikView Direct Discovery is a hybrid approach that leverages both in-memory data and data that is dynamically queried from an external source.Some of the main benefits of QlikView Direct Discovery are:Consolidate relevant data fr... Show More

    Yesterday we announced QlikView 11.2. The main new feature in this release is QlikView Direct Discovery. With this exciting feature, QlikView does not require loading all data into the QlikView in-memory engine anymore. QlikView Direct Discovery is a hybrid approach that leverages both in-memory data and data that is dynamically queried from an external source.

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    Some of the main benefits of QlikView Direct Discovery are:

    • Consolidate relevant data from multiple sources, including Big Data repositories

    In addition to the current decision support environments like EDW, data marts and operational data stores, organizations are now also considering the big data storage environments, such as Hadoop, BigQuery or Teradata etc. The challenge is enabling business users to analyze data from all of these data sources in the same analytics application. QlikView Direct Discovery offers a hybrid approach solving this challenge. It allows users to seamlessly run queries on the big data stores while they do discoveries on the data extracted from their ERP systems, data marts, EDW or even from their excel files into memory.

    • Maintain associations among all the data, regardless of where it is located

    The level of details that is stored in the big data stores is usually very granular. Business users need an easier navigation means in this bulk of data. QlikView Direct Discovery leverages associations in the data, making extremely large datasets manageable.

    For example, a policy analyst who uses a QlikView app to analyze regional loss and revenue information on a daily basis, would know the region names, but he would not have any clues on the specific policy numbers for these regions. With Direct Discovery, he can select the regional info, as he would do every day, and QlikView would automatically associate and query the billions of policy-level information on the big data store and display the query results with the in-memory metrics on the same QlikView app for the selected region.

    • Access Big Data without complex data modeling or programming

    It is very easy to use Direct Discovery feature on a QlikView application. The only thing that is changed is to use “DIRECT SELECT” on the load script instead of using “SQL SELECT”. This new keyword would indicate QlikView that the data source is a direct discovery source. In this case, QlikView would only load the field names and will bring the data to the user interface when a direct discovery field is used on a QlikView chart. More information on the technical aspect of this feature can be found in this technical addendum paper. A how-to video is also available here.

    Please note that QlikView 11.2 is a new release of QlikView, with one new feature, QlikView Direct Discovery. Please read the QlikView 11.2 Release Note document that is available on the download site before upgrading to QlikView 11.2 to learn more about the release and some of the bug fixes with this release. With this release, the QlikView 11 branch will be stopped and new service releases will be  made for QlikView 11.2 instead. For more information on this subject, please contact the QlikTech Support team.

    Since we announced this new feature in October, we have seen great excitement in our customer and partner community as they see the potential of QlikView 11.2 enabling Business Discovery with Big Data, without any data size limitations. QlikView 11.2 is now available on our download site if you also would like to expand your business discovery capabilities on the data sets that were previously used separately, or not used, because of their bulk and the development effort required!

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    Qlik Design Blog

    Holiday Gift! - Organize the files on your machine

    Do you use the generic search engine on your OS to find the document you are looking for?  Have you had any luck finding it within one minute?  Well, I haven’t.  So I decided to go back to the old fashion way.  QlikView way.  The associative way.  Here is my background.  I use Windows, so I search for something like “How QlikTech uses QlikView” in “Search programs and files” box above the “start” button. This is where the disaster begins.  It fou... Show More

    Do you use the generic search engine on your OS to find the document you are looking for?  Have you had any luck finding it within one minute?  Well, I haven’t.  So I decided to go back to the old fashion way.  QlikView way.  The associative way. 

    Here is my background.  I use Windows, so I search for something like “How QlikTech uses QlikView” in “Search programs and files” box above the “start” button.

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    This is where the disaster begins.  It found 1,270 items.  I know I didn’t make that many documents with that name.  What it’s finding is all the files that contain at least one of the key words in the file name, including as an attachment to emails.  It also searches for the content of the document.  It’s overwhelming to find what I am looking for from this long list, but Windows doesn’t give me an option to filter by a document type or by a folder these ppt may belong to. 

    I just needed a way to simply find my files in my folder by the name and not the content .  So I created this application called Find My Files.qvw.  If you’d like to try it, download  the app and specify the root directory in the box and hit “Reload” button in QlikView.  If you start with the highest hierarchy directory, it may take longer than expected depending on the number of files you have.  For example, I have 106GB used in my C: drive, and I care about only what’s in my user folder.  So I loaded all the files in that folder, which is 37GB in total.  It took only 1 minute to read in all the files.  If you don’t want to read all the files, you can specify the extensions in the loop such as qvw, xls, xlsx, doc, docx, ppt, pptx etc.  The reload time will be faster, especially if you are reading the entire hard disk.

    The script of this app is pretty simple, and it is one of the help sample codes.  Many people may be already familiar with it. 

    Using this app, I know there are 18 files in my machine for “Making a good design great” ppt and not 1270.

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    Yes, there are various desktop search software available out there, but why is this app any better?  This app also helps you organize your hard drive.  For example, when you are running out of disk space and need to know which folder is consuming the most disk space, you may want to know which folder I can consider eliminating.  Windows Explorer doesn’t give you the folder size, so you need to right click and see the properties to see how large the folder is.  If the folder is 10GB, you sit and wait for the properties box to appear.  Bummer.  Use this application, and you will be more efficient with your work life.

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    Download this application and the technical brief from here.

    Ho Ho Ho… Happy Holidays to you (belated)!

    Shimanta (Shima-Santa)

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    Qlik Design Blog

    Helping Hands

    The holiday season is often a time when we consider our blessings, our shortcomings, our needs, and the needs of others.  As a special Christmas blog post, I felt it may be good to share my experiences working with Tiny Hands International (THI), a non-profit organization that works specifically with orphans, street children, and sex-trafficking victims. It was an eye-opening experience for me that gave me insight into the needs of the victims as... Show More

    tinyhandslogo.pngThe holiday season is often a time when we consider our blessings, our shortcomings, our needs, and the needs of others.  As a special Christmas blog post, I felt it may be good to share my experiences working with Tiny Hands International (THI), a non-profit organization that works specifically with orphans, street children, and sex-trafficking victims. It was an eye-opening experience for me that gave me insight into the needs of the victims as well as the organization itself.

    I was having lunch several months ago with the founder of THI, John Molineux, who is a good friend of mine from college.  At one point in our conversation, John expressed that they had been looking for a good way to analyze the data they collect when they intercept trafficking victims at border checkpoints in Nepal.  Each year, 10-15,000 women are deceived and trafficked out of Nepal where they are then sold as sex slaves.  More specifically, John mentioned to me that they had been hoping for a tool that would allow them to visualize the paths the victims take when they are trafficked. This could be useful in identifying the most commonly used routes, and it could perhaps give insight into how they could best focus their efforts.  Of course, I knew QlikView could be a great help to them, and we got to work loading THI’s data.  Once they identified the paths of the victims geographically in the data, it was easy to use a map extension to visualize the paths, drawing the more highly traveled paths with thicker lines:

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    The data is very raw, and THI is thinking of ways to optimize their collection and identification of paths, but even so, some trends and useful information can be seen with the map.  For example, the dark red area on the east side of the map shows that a lot of activity is occurring at this checkpoint, including some of the thicker lines.  Of course, using QlikView’s associative filtering, we can choose to display only the top 15 routes:

    maptoproutes.png

    Or focus in on a specific border checkpoint like the eastern one I mentioned earlier:

    mapeast.png

    We were also able to use an expression to color the most traveled routes in red, while coloring the less traveled routes in yellow and green:

    mapcolored.png

    Overall, we were very excited to see start seeing the story the data was telling us, and ideas were flowing on how they could further optimize their data collection and leverage QlikView’s analysis in their planning.

    What I realized in working with Tiny Hands International is that charity organizations are businesses too. They also need the ability to analyze data and be as efficient as possible. Knowledge is power after all, and wasted time, money, and resources mean a less effective fight against injustice.

    More than that, working with THI was a staunch reminder for me that there are people in the world right now doing selfless honorable work to improve the plight of their fellow humans. Oftentimes I sit at my warm desk feeling separated from this world, but I hope that as I'm humbled through experiences like this, I will consider the ways I might help to affect positive change in the world.

    If you’d like to support the work of Tiny Hands International, please go to their website.  A small gift from us could have a large impact on those in need.

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    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    QlikView Governance Dashboard Beta 2 Now Available

    The QlikView Governance Dashboard Beta 2 is now available on QlikMarket: http://market.qlik.com/qlikview-governance-dashboard.htmlThe Beta 2 version of the Governance Dashboard fixes a number of bugs and adds the following new features and improvements:Session Activity Heat Map: The Statistics Sheet has a new Session Overview tab that presents a heat chart of QlikView session activity over the preceding 14 days. The heat chart makes it possible t... Show More

    The QlikView Governance Dashboard Beta 2 is now available on QlikMarket: http://market.qlik.com/qlikview-governance-dashboard.html

    The Beta 2 version of the Governance Dashboard fixes a number of bugs and adds the following new features and improvements:

    • Session Activity Heat Map: The Statistics Sheet has a new Session Overview tab that presents a heat chart of QlikView session activity over the preceding 14 days. The heat chart makes it possible to see the most active time periods. By selecting on a specific hour cell on the heat chart, users can immediately see the sessions that were active during that hour and the users and documents that were in use.

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    • Publisher Task Duration and Error Reporting: The “Publisher Task Listing” on the Publisher tab of the Statistics Sheet now shows the duration for completed tasks. (Note that the new Publisher Datetime format field on the Configuration Sheet must be set to match the Publisher’s datetime format to get valid durations.) The “Publisher Task Listing” has also been improved to use red text for tasks that failed to execute. The Status field value for jobs that failed to execute begin with the word “Errors” and contains the full set of error messages scanned from the TaskResults file of the failed job.

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    • Lineage for QlikView Expressor Dataflows: The Data Lineage Sheet contains a new Expressor source type that can be selected to easily show all sources of data used by QlikView Expressor Dataflows whose output QVX files are included in the scan. The “Sources” listing for QlikView Expressor data provides the names of all dataflow operators that contributed data to the generated QVX file. The “Processes” list provides the name of the dataflow and step within it as well as the Deployment Package and Deployment Package directory. The “Load, Select Statements” list shows the list of all queries used by the selected process or source as well as the connection parameters associated with the query.

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    • User Config Variable Script: Users can now have the Governance Dashboard execute a script to define common variables to use on the Configuration Sheet. This makes it easier to use a single configured Governance Dashboard in multiple environments, such as development and test environments, by changing the variable settings in the script file rather than the Governance Dashboard itself.

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    Regards,

    The Products Team

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    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    QlikView Salesforce Connector 11.00 SR1 Now Available

    QlikView Salesforce Connector 11.00 SR1 is now generally available to customers and partners. This is a bug fix release. The software and release notes can be found on the download site.http://global.qlik.com/downloadPlease report any issues to the QlikTech Support group through the normal channelsKind regards,The Products Team
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    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    QlikView Expressor 3.8.3 Now Available

    Qliview Expressor 3.8.3 is now generally available for customers and partners to download at http://global.qlik.com/download. This is an update release that addresses a number of issues identified in the releases notes. This release contains an important fix for the QlikView Expressor Connector in which the connecter dialog would lock of the QlikView Desktop script editor when attempting to reference previously used QlikView Expressor deployment ... Show More

    Qliview Expressor 3.8.3 is now generally available for customers and partners to download at http://global.qlik.com/download. This is an update release that addresses a number of issues identified in the releases notes. This release contains an important fix for the QlikView Expressor Connector in which the connecter dialog would lock of the QlikView Desktop script editor when attempting to reference previously used QlikView Expressor deployment packages.

    Please review the release notes for more information.

    http://global.qlik.com/download

    NOTE: When searching for the software ensure to use the View All / Search tab to enable the Expressor filter in the select box.

    Please report any issues to the QlikTech Support group through the normal channels

    Regards,

    The Products Team

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    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    QlikView 11.2 Now Available

    QlikView 11.2 is now generally available to customers and partners. The software and release notes can be found on the download site (http://global.qlik.com/download). The main new capability in this release is QlikView Direct Discovery. QlikView Direct Discovery is a hybrid approach that leverages both in-memory data and data that is dynamically queried from an external source. Please note that QlikView 11.2 is a new release of QlikView. With th... Show More

    QlikView 11.2 is now generally available to customers and partners. The software and release notes can be found on the download site (http://global.qlik.com/download).

    The main new capability in this release is QlikView Direct Discovery. QlikView Direct Discovery is a hybrid approach that leverages both in-memory data and data that is dynamically queried from an external source. Please note that QlikView 11.2 is a new release of QlikView. With this release, the QlikView 11 branch will be stopped and new service releases will be  made for QlikView 11.2 instead. For more information on this subject, please contact the QlikTech Support team.

    More information on this exciting feature can be found at the Business Discovery Blog post and the Design Blog post.

    Regards,

    The Products Team

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    Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

    QlikView 10 SR6 Now Available

    QlikView 10 SR6 is now generally available to customers and partners. The software and release notes can be found on the download site (http://global.qlik.com/download). This release also includes the solution to the security issue that was addressed in the QlikView 11 SR2 update, details of which can be referenced here http://community.qlik.com/blogs/technicalbulletin/2012/11/29/qlikview-11-sr2-updatehttp://global.qlik.com/downloadPlease report ... Show More

    QlikView 10 SR6 is now generally available to customers and partners. The software and release notes can be found on the download site (http://global.qlik.com/download). This release also includes the solution to the security issue that was addressed in the QlikView 11 SR2 update, details of which can be referenced here http://community.qlik.com/blogs/technicalbulletin/2012/11/29/qlikview-11-sr2-update

    http://global.qlik.com/download

    Please report any issues to the QlikTech Support group through the normal channels

    Kind regards,

    The Products Team

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