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Hear directly from Qlik employees in our ten unique blogs.

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Qlik Academic Program Blog

This forum was created for professors and students using Qlik within academia.

Qlik Product Innovation Blog

Learn about what's new across all of the products in our growing Qlik product portfolio.

Support Updates Blog

Important and useful support information about end-of-product support, new service releases, and general support topics.

Qlik Design Blog

All about product and Qlik solutions: scripting, data modeling, visual design, extensions, best practices, etc.

Community News

Updates about Qlik Community Platform as well as news and announcements.

Qlik Education Blog

On this forum you can access and follow the latest updates of our courses and programs with the Qlik Education team.

Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

Information on all new product releases, connectors, beta programs, and technical product information.

Japan Blog

Qlik Community blogs for our customers and partners in Japan.

Recent Blog Posts

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    Qlik Design Blog

    Regression Lines

    What is a regression line? In simple terms, it is a line that best describes the behavior of a set of data. They are often used for forecasting to illustrate the relationship between the dependent y variable and the independent x variables when there is linear pattern. Using a regression line can show future behavior of the dependent variable using different inputs for the independent x variables. Scatter plots now support regression lines and pr... Show More

    What is a regression line? In simple terms, it is a line that best describes the behavior of a set of data. They are often used for forecasting to illustrate the relationship between the dependent y variable and the independent x variables when there is linear pattern. Using a regression line can show future behavior of the dependent variable using different inputs for the independent x variables. Scatter plots now support regression lines and provide many options to choose from. In the properties pane of the scatter plot chart under Add-ons, is an option for Regression Lines.

    add reg line.png

    Click the Add Regression Line button to add a regression line to your chart. There are many types to choose from depending on your data and what you would like to show. According the Qlik Help, here are the regression line types available to add to a scatter plot chart.

    types.png

    • Average: Shows the average value of the data.
    • Linear: Shows a linear increase or decrease of values.
    • Second Degree Polynomial: Shows a curved line to represent fluctuating data with one hill or valley.
    • Third Degree Polynomial: Shows a curved line to represent fluctuating data with up to two hills or valleys.
    • Fourth Degree Polynomial: Shows a curved line to represent fluctuating data with up to three hills or valleys.
    • Exponential: Shows a curved line. Use when data values rise or fall at increasingly higher rates.
    • Logarithmic: Shows a curved line. Use when the rate of change in data increases or decreases quickly, then levels out.
    • Power: Shows a curved line. Use with data sets that compare measurements that increase at specific rates.

     

    Here are some regression line examples:

    AverageAverageLinearLinearSecond Degree PolynomialSecond Degree PolynomialFourth Degree PolynomialFourth Degree Polynomial

    There are some additional properties that can be set for a regression line. The color of the line and label can be set, and the line can be displayed as solid or dashed. The direction of fit can also be set to either minimize vertically or minimize horizontally. A scatter plot can also have more than one regression as seen in the chart below.

    multiple.png

    Regression lines are helpful for analysis because it allows us to see patterns in our data. They allow us to see the relationships between two or more variables and examine which variables may have an impact. Check them out - Qlik Sense makes it easy to use them in your scatter plots charts.

    Thanks,

    Jennell

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    Qlik Product Innovation Blog

    Qlik Replicate and Qlik Enterprise Manager May 2022 Client Managed Release Highl...

    “THE DI IS STRONG IN THIS ONE” – OK so it’s no longer May the 4th but there is another awesome reason to celebrate in May, with the Qlik Data Integration portfolio May 2022 releases. 
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    Support Updates Blog

    Support Expires for QlikView Versions 12.40 and 12.50 by the end of April, 2022

    April 27 & April 29 marks End of Support for QlikView Versions 12.50 and 12.40, respectively
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    Community News

    May = QlikWorld + Community Enhancements

    Hello Qlik Community! QlikWorld 2022 is less than a week away! Are you all excited?! We sure are! If you’re not already registered, you may do so here. Qlik Community will be a part of the “Let’s Connect!” booth, so stop by and say ‘Hi’! I cannot believe it’s May already – in the US that means schools are winding down and summer is coming! Bring on the sunshine, pool, and BBQ! For the Qlik Community, that means we have some hot new updates for yo... Show More

    Hello Qlik Community!

    QlikWorld 2022 is less than a week away! Are you all excited?! We sure are!

    If you’re not already registered, you may do so here. Qlik Community will be a part of the “Let’s Connect!” booth, so stop by and say ‘Hi’!

    I cannot believe it’s May already – in the US that means schools are winding down and summer is coming! Bring on the sunshine, pool, and BBQ! For the Qlik Community, that means we have some hot new updates for you!

    Product List

    Products are primarily used within our Support Knowledgebase and Release Notes. We’ve cleaned up the products list to make filtering easier. We also condensed Qlik Sense Enterprise SaaS and Qlik Sense Business to one product, Qlik Cloud.

    products.png

     

    Qlik Cloud Change Log

    Use the new Qlik Cloud Change Log card on the Product News carousel for easy access to what’s new in Qlik Cloud. A link to the Help page has also been added to the Qlik Cloud release notes (going forward).

    changelog.png

     

    Chat Bot

    Have you reached an inaccessible area on Qlik Community? The message directs you where to go for assistance, but we’ve also added the Chat Bot to the page so you can easily reach out to Customer Support for assistance!

    errorchatbot.png

     

    Typically, we would be on a freeze until July but we are just too excited to wait for the upcoming enhancements! Check back in a few weeks for a few new updates!

    Your Qlik Community Admins,

    Melissa, Sue, Jamie and Nicole

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    Qlik Product Innovation Blog

    Exciting updates to Qlik Compose are now available

    A new release of Qlik Data Integration is here, with exciting updates to Compose. These updates address our customers’ needs across data lake creation and improved warehouse automation. 
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    Support Updates Blog

    Deprecation of basic authentication for Exchange Online and Gmail

    Google and Microsoft announced basic authentication deprecation for their email services in 2022. Both companies consider Basic authentication as an outdated industry standard and thus they are suggesting its customer moving to OAuth 2.0 token-based authorization. Additional details can be found here. These changes will have a limited impact since the services that were already using SMTP with Basic authentication will not be impacted by the chan... Show More

    Google and Microsoft announced basic authentication deprecation for their email services in 2022. Both companies consider Basic authentication as an outdated industry standard and thus they are suggesting its customer moving to OAuth 2.0 token-based authorization. Additional details can be found here.

    These changes will have a limited impact since the services that were already using SMTP with Basic authentication will not be impacted by the change.

    Impact:

    • For Google-Gmail, Basic authentication will be disabled starting May 30, 2022, and its still unclear if Google will allow it to be enabled post this date.  
    • For Microsoft-Outlook, Basic authentication will be disabled starting October 1, 2022, but Microsoft will still allow it to be enabled as needed.

     

    You can follow the steps provided to enable basic authentication on Exchange Online or “Less secure app access” for your Google Account.

     

    For further details, please review our detailed Knowledge Base article.

    Thanks for choosing Qlik!

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    Qlik Product Innovation Blog

    What's New - Qlik Sense May 2022 - Now available!

    Qlik Sense May 2022 Client Managed is available for download!     You will find many enhancements recently added to Qlik Cloud, now available in Qlik Sense client-managed spanning from Augmented analytics to visualizations, connectivity, and platform management.   Download here.
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    Qlik Design Blog

    Floor It!

    Have you ever tried to compare two dates that looked the same to find out that in fact they were different?  I was recently approached by a colleague who had this problem.  In their script, they were adding a flag when the date in a field was also the last day of the month.  Both dates were formatted to show the month, day and year (M/D/YYYY) but the flag was never true even when the dates appeared to be the same.  When working with dates, you ma... Show More

    Have you ever tried to compare two dates that looked the same to find out that in fact they were different?  I was recently approached by a colleague who had this problem.  In their script, they were adding a flag when the date in a field was also the last day of the month.  Both dates were formatted to show the month, day and year (M/D/YYYY) but the flag was never true even when the dates appeared to be the same.  When working with dates, you may find that although two dates are formatted the same, the underlying values may be different.  To troubleshoot this, we used the Num function to get the numeric value of the two dates we were comparing in the script to see if the two dates were the same numerically.  Take a look at the table below for an example of how we resolved the issue.

     

    Steps Date 1 Date 2 Notes

    Start with these dates2018-10-05 05:16:5010/5/2018 
    Format Date 1 to display the date like Date 2 is formatted

    Date('2018-10-05 05:16:50', 'M/D/YYYY')

    >>

    10/5/2018

    10/5/2018 
    Is Date 1 = Date 2?10/5/201810/5/2018No, not equal
    Use Num() to see numeric value of dates

    Num(‘2018-10-05 05:16:50’)

    >>

    43378.220023148

    Num(10/5/2018)

    >>

    43378

    The numerical values of Date 1 and Date 2 are not the same
    Use Floor to round Date 1 down to just the date

    Num(Floor(‘2018-10-05 05:16:50’))

    >>

    43378

    Num(10/5/2018)

    >>

    43378

     
    Using Floor, is Date 1 = Date 2?

    Num(Floor(‘2018-10-05 05:16:50’))

    >>

    43378

    Num(10/5/2018)

    >>

    43378

    Yes, they are equal

     

    So let’s explain what is going on here.  We started with 2 dates – one that had a timestamp and one that did not.  After formatting the dates the same, it was determined that the dates were not equal.  This is because the underlying numeric value of Date 1 still included the time even though the time was not visible after it was formatted as M/D/YYYY.  The numeric value of 2018-10-05 05:16:50 is 43378.220023148 while the numeric value of 10/5/2018 is 43378.  When looking at the numeric values, the value before the decimal point represents the date and the value after the decimal point represents the time.  To handle this, the Floor function was used.  According to Qlik Sense Help,

     

    Floor() rounds down a number to the nearest multiple of the step shifted by the offset number.

    Compare with the ceil function, which rounds input numbers up.

    Syntax: 

    Floor(x[, step[, offset]])

     

    Once the floor function was used, Date 1 was rounded down to just the date, giving it a numeric value of 43378 - the same as Date 2.

     

    It is helpful to remember that dates have numeric values.  We often see dates formatted to meet our needs which is great but when we need to compare dates, we need to look beyond the displayed date and look at the numeric date.  The Date function controls how the date is displayed but it does not change the underlying value of the date.  In this example, the Floor function rounded the timestamp down to just the date.  The Ceil function works similarly except it rounds up.  You can also check out Henric Cronstrom’s blog titled Why don’t my dates work? for other date related issues you may stumble upon.  I hope you find this blog helpful and that it helps you quickly troubleshoot date comparison issues should they arise.

     

    Thanks,

    Jennell

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    Qlik Product Innovation Blog

    Qlik Reporting Service, a new approach to report distribution in the cloud

    Reporting continues to be at the core of the BI and analytics category for many.  Not everyone has access to a dashboard, but most workers are still responsible for daily decision-making and subsequent action. Many execs and rank and file still prefer their daily/weekly flash style reporting to manage the business or obtain their go-to daily information. With the introduction of the Qlik Reporting Service, Qlik puts our customers squarely on the ... Show More

    Reporting continues to be at the core of the BI and analytics category for many.  Not everyone has access to a dashboard, but most workers are still responsible for daily decision-making and subsequent action. Many execs and rank and file still prefer their daily/weekly flash style reporting to manage the business or obtain their go-to daily information. 

    With the introduction of the Qlik Reporting Service, Qlik puts our customers squarely on the path of a Cloud reporting experience as a complementary ingredient to our Active Intelligence vision.

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    Qlik Product Innovation Blog

    Highlights of Recent Qlik Sense SaaS Data Visualization Capabilities

    As a proven leader in BI and analytics, it’s no surprise that Qlik Sense SaaS provides an extensive library of beautiful, intelligent, interactive, and responsive visuals to deliver actionable insights. And, the evolution of Qlik Sense SaaS data visualization continues. Over the past two years, there have been so many improvements to Qlik visualizations that it may seem overwhelming. So, let’s cut through and highlight five recent updates that gi... Show More

    As a proven leader in BI and analytics, it’s no surprise that Qlik Sense SaaS provides an extensive library of beautiful, intelligent, interactive, and responsive visuals to deliver actionable insights. And, the evolution of Qlik Sense SaaS data visualization continues. Over the past two years, there have been so many improvements to Qlik visualizations that it may seem overwhelming. So, let’s cut through and highlight five recent updates that give you greater flexibility and make it easier for you to interpret your data insights.

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    Support Updates Blog

    Qlik View May 2021 Service Release 2

    Latest release of Qlik View May 2021 version is available as of December 7, 2021
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    Qlik Academic Program Blog

    University of Tasmania students learn data analytics using Qlik Academic Program

    The Qlik Academic Program is being leveraged by many Universities in Australia and New Zealand.  More than 45 Universities from ANZ are using the academic program resources to enable the student and educator community in analytics. A local study by Arktic Fox and Michael Page Australia has identified data and analytics as the number one skill gap in marketing teams. Most marketing leaders say data literacy was not strong in their departments. To ... Show More

    The Qlik Academic Program is being leveraged by many Universities in Australia and New Zealand.  More than 45 Universities from ANZ are using the academic program resources to enable the student and educator community in analytics. 

    A local study by Arktic Fox and Michael Page Australia has identified data and analytics as the number one skill gap in marketing teams. Most marketing leaders say data literacy was not strong in their departments. To fulfill this gap and also a growing demand for data analytics resources, the Qlik Academic Program provides top class analytics software, training, qualifications, certifications to University students and professors, completely free.  

    The University of Tasmania (UTAS) has been partnering with the Qlik Academic Program for a number of years now. Each year, Charlie Farah, Senior Director, Solutions and Value Engineering at Qlik presents to the students on all things data and analytics.  

    Dr. Joel Scanlan from UTAS who collaborates with Charlie on this initiatives says, “ We are very grateful to Charlie for his time and continued support”

    The primary course is the Master of Health Information Management which aims to equip students with a strong awareness of the role that data and information have on modern healthcare, with particular interest in Data Analytics, Privacy and Security, ethics, and governance. A number of these components are also covered in the Graduate Certificate in eHealth also.

    Charlie is invited to present to students enrolled in subject BAA735 Health Data Management, Information Analysis and Improvement which delves into key theories and approaches in health data management and information. Frameworks and models for information analysis and reporting are also investigated, including strategies for measuring and monitoring organisational and clinical outcomes and experiences. Something world leading data & analytics software is critical for.

    Students get practical hands on with a range of data, including a deep dive into a dataset of their own choosing using Qlik Cloud. This equips them to be able to analyse and understand data, to see its impact not only on clinical outcomes, but also the efficiency of care delivery and better equip them for their roles ahead.

    Joel Scanlan further says that they look forward to continuing this partnership for many years ahead.  The Qlik Academic Program is happy to work with UTAS and forge a strong partnership to enable its students and professors in data analytics.

    For more information about the academic program, visit: qlik.com/academicprogram

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    Qlik Design Blog

    Qlik Sense Version Control

    There is no doubt that having some sort of version control system baked into your development workflow is very important especially when challenges like storing and maintaining different backup versions of a project or collaborating with other members of your team become a nightmare.A version control system makes all these problems disappear as it enables you to commit changes you make throughout the lifetime of a project, giving you access to hi... Show More

    There is no doubt that having some sort of version control system baked into your development workflow is very important especially when challenges like storing and maintaining different backup versions of a project or collaborating with other members of your team become a nightmare.

    A version control system makes all these problems disappear as it enables you to commit changes you make throughout the lifetime of a project, giving you access to historical versions that you can easily roll back to. It also allows for easier collaboration as multiple people can simultaneously work on the same project by branching out into their own isolated environments without impacting the work of others in a controllable and maintainable manner.

    diagram-git.jpegWhen it comes to Qlik Sense, the lack of version control capabilities has opened the door to both simple solutions that can work for a smaller context as well as more creative ones to fill in the gap. From copying applications that may lead to a cluttered workspace, to manually creating your own system using a combination of Git and serializing your Qlik Sense apps, to sophisticated third-party solutions that take care of the heavy lifting, you can test and choose the option that fits your needs.

    You can visit this Knowledge Base post to discover more Qlik Sense version control solutions.

    In this blog post, I gave one of these solutions a go to see how adding version control can change the way you develop your Qlik Sense apps in the future.

    Gitoqlok is a chrome extension that does just that, it integrates your VCS of choice such as Github, BitBucket, Gitlab, Gitea, etc … with your Qlik Sense App through their respective APIs. It uses the concept of serializing application objects to JSON and deserializing them back. The supported objects include story, sheet, measure, dimension, masterobject, snapshot, variable, bookmark, appprops, and fields.

    Capture-gitoqlok-how-does-it-work.PNG
    Source: gitoqlik.com

    To get started, install the chrome extension here.

    1. Connect Gitoqlik to the Github API using your personal token:
    Visit Github to generate a new token and check the “repo” scope. Copy over your newly generated token into the "Git Settings" page of the extension. Make sure to go over the settings including your repository visibility (private or public), how your repo and branches will be named by default, etc..

    InkedCapture-step1_LI.jpg

     

    2. Once you create your app, you are ready to use the extension to create a repository. Gitoqlok makes this easy as it automatically detects your Qlik app, generates a default repo name based on the settings previously selected, and creates a master branch.

    3. As you’re making progress developing the app (loading data, scripting, creating a data model, analyzing and visualizing data), you can commit your changes into the repo every time. Your commits can include the Load Script, the App Objects, Reload Tasks, and Data Connections.
    You can use the git commit history to view your changes and revert to a previous state.

    Capture-step3.PNG
    4. You can collaborate with other people from your team so that each team member works on their own copy of the app in their own workspace.
    Each team member would create an isolated branch inside the repository so that their changes do not affect the master branch. Gitoqlik makes this process seamless as it detects that copies of the main application have been created and finds the main repository allowing you to branch out with a single click.

    Capture-step4.PNG

    For more information about this tool, check out the docs.

    I would love to hear what techniques you use to collaborate or track your changes when developing QS apps. If you have any suggestions for integrating version control with Qlik Sense, please leave them in the comments below.

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    Support Updates Blog

    Qlik Forts Now Available - Bring Cloud Analytics to your Data!

    We are excited to unveil Qlik Forts, available now!  Qlik Forts are new hybrid services that securely extend Qlik Sense SaaS capabilities to wherever your data must reside – on-premises, in a private cloud, or a public cloud. Qlik Forts enables businesses to benefit from the convenience of SaaS as well as the flexibility of a hybrid deployment that supports data governance and regulatory requirements, data locality needs, and investments in exist... Show More

    We are excited to unveil Qlik Forts, available now!  Qlik Forts are new hybrid services that securely extend Qlik Sense SaaS capabilities to wherever your data must reside – on-premises, in a private cloud, or a public cloud. Qlik Forts enables businesses to benefit from the convenience of SaaS as well as the flexibility of a hybrid deployment that supports data governance and regulatory requirements, data locality needs, and investments in existing data infrastructure. ​ 

    Qlik Forts are pre-packaged, pre-configured virtual appliances, ready to run in your virtualization/IaaS platform of choice.  The complexity of maintaining a Fort is handled by Qlik - we ensure that Qlik Forts are always up to date with the latest updates so your IT team never have to worry about ongoing maintenance or updates.  

    Qlik Forts and Qlik Cloud work together as a single solution, so users get a seamless experience with a single point-of-entry to all analytics content​.  

    • Qlik Forts run securely behind your firewall 
    • All data and apps remain local in the Fort, and there is no ingress required  
    • Users can access Qlik Forts any time when securely connected to your network.​ 

     

    Get Started Tutorial here!

     

    Other resources:  

    Visit our website here  

    Join our Do More with Qlik - Introduction to Qlik Forts webinar on November 10.

    Engage with our experts and ask questions in our support portal or Qlik Sense product Forum.    

     

    Thank you for choosing Qlik! 

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    Qlik Product Innovation Blog

    Insight Advisor Analysis Types - Sophisticated AI-generated analyses in a few cl...

    This month, we released Insight Advisor Analysis Types, a new capability that allows users to request a variety of business analyses, such as a comparison, ranking, trending, clustering, period-over-period, etc. which will be generated in the best possible way by AI. 
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    Qlik Academic Program Blog

    The Qlik Academic Program returns to the University of Southampton

    Last Friday the Qlik Academic Program ran a hybrid lecture session for Masters students at the University of Southampton for educator Fatema Zaghloul. With lots of universities still pursuing a blended model of education, I ran my section of the lecture virtually, while our Solution Architect Marius Popa attended in person to introduce the students to Qlik Sense. This session was run for a group Fatema’s students studying a Data Analytics and Org... Show More

    Last Friday the Qlik Academic Program ran a hybrid lecture session for Masters students at the University of Southampton for educator Fatema Zaghloul. With lots of universities still pursuing a blended model of education, I ran my section of the lecture virtually, while our Solution Architect Marius Popa attended in person to introduce the students to Qlik Sense. 

    This session was run for a group Fatema’s students studying a Data Analytics and Organisational Decision Making module. The module is designed to provide students with a knowledge of how information systems and analytical tools can be used to tap into big data and enhance decision making within different organizational contexts. We had over 100 students attend in person and a further 15 online.

    HollyJohnson_0-1651582142409.jpeg

    Marius spent just under an hour introducing the students to a couple of industry specific uses cases. Here is what lecturer Fatema Zaghloul had to say about the session:

    “Inviting guest speakers offers students the opportunity to meet passionate industry experts and learn from them in various ways. During this guest lecture, students learned about a wide range of current business scenarios and Qlik use applications, such as within UK emergency services (NHS, police forces), retail sector, and the electronics industry. The session presented a broader view of the real-life data-related problems that such organisations face, and how Qlik presents a possible solution.

    Marius introduced students to Qlik Sense and demonstrated how the use of Qlik supported a UK hospital in improving their operations by making staff meetings more focused, especially during times of crisis, and more evidence-based, while freeing up employee time to focus on enhancing the patient experience.

    The session provided an excellent opportunity for students to learn how to apply the theoretical concepts they have learned in classes to practice and real-life scenarios. They were familiar with tools such as Microsoft Power BI and Tableau, and the ability to learn another software was very valuable.”

    HollyJohnson_3-1651583658987.jpeg

     In addition to this Marius received comments from students expressing their enthusiasm for the session, one came from Vishnu who said “It was great attending your guest lecture session conducted last week. What you do at Qlik sounded fascinating and it totally inspired me!”. Marius finished the session by showing the students you can use Qlik Sense to explore data sets related to hobbies and interests too, before showing them an app he'd build based on the Game of Thrones book series.

    We really enjoy running these sessions for our Academic Program members. Receiving feedback such as the above, and about how the program has supported students in their study of data analytics, is part of why we run the program.  If you’re interested in learning more about our free Qlik Academic Program, you can follow this link: https://www.qlik.com/us/academicprogram.

     

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    Qlik Design Blog

    Internet of Things - A Retro-gaming Perspective (video)

    Hey guys - I recently was inspired at Qonnections 2018 by our Big Data Qlik IoT Race game, so much so that I had to understand how it all worked and wanted to play with the underlying technology. Aside from gathering the statistics and providing an analysis on the results, I was really interested in learning about those little devices or "things" that were connected to the track. However, how would I use something like that? Not really knowing an... Show More

    layout.pngHey guys - I recently was inspired at Qonnections 2018 by our Big Data Qlik IoT Race game, so much so that I had to understand how it all worked and wanted to play with the underlying technology. Aside from gathering the statistics and providing an analysis on the results, I was really interested in learning about those little devices or "things" that were connected to the track. However, how would I use something like that? Not really knowing anything about Arduino, WEMOS and IoT in general, I set out on a mission to learn about this fascinating technology while incorporating somethings I enjoy such as Qlik and retro-gaming. Take a look how I made IoT interesting and fun to learn, by incorporating a Retrogaming spin and of course added some Qlik Sense data analysis.

    5-9-2018 9-47-26 PM.png

    Atari Action Analysis Dashboard

    Thanks guys, hope you enjoyed it. Let me know what you think by leaving your questions and comments. I'll do my best to respond.

    Can't see the video? YouTube blocked by your region or organization?

    A copy of the video can be downloaded or streamed from here:

    Regards,

    Michael Tarallo (@mtarallo) | Twitter

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    Support Updates Blog

    May Qlik Forts Be with You! Q&A with Qlik Live Webinar - May 4, 2022

    Join our live Q&A with Qlik webinar this Wednesday, May 4th for an open "office-hours" with our Qlik Techsperts! This month's topic is on Qlik Forts. Submit your questions at registration, comment them below, or ask them in real time during the session.  Register Here!   May Qlik Forts be with you,  Global Support
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    Qlik Design Blog

    Get to know the Engine API with Qixplorer

    For those of us who want to go beyond the out-of-the-box capabilities of Qlik Sense and want to leverage the full potential of the platform to create complex visualizations or satisfy custom development needs, understanding the Engine API is fundamental to taking advantage of what Qlik Sense hides under the hood.The Qlik Engine API is a websocket protocol that uses JSON RPC 2.0 to communicate between the Qlik Associative Engine and clients. It wo... Show More

    For those of us who want to go beyond the out-of-the-box capabilities of Qlik Sense and want to leverage the full potential of the platform to create complex visualizations or satisfy custom development needs, understanding the Engine API is fundamental to taking advantage of what Qlik Sense hides under the hood.

    The Qlik Engine API is a websocket protocol that uses JSON RPC 2.0 to communicate between the Qlik Associative Engine and clients. It works independently of any platform and programming language as long as it supports WebSockets and can parse JSON.

    A great place to get your feet wet with trying out the Engine API is through Qixplorer (You might remember this as the Engine API Explorer on Qlik Managed). The tool that you can access at https://qixplorer.qlik.dev features a newly reimagined user interface and additional updates for a better experience.

    Untitled1.png

    Right off the bat, you can see that the format is divided into 4 main sections:

    • Left: This is where you configure your connection to the tenant, pick the app, and browse through methods made available for your selected object.
    • Middle: This is where you can see your requests and responses
    • Bottom: This area is where you can construct and modify your requests and execute them
    • Right: This is a neat feature that shows you inline documentation as you explore API methods

    Other settings include a Light/Dark mode toggle at the top left, as well as a Layout toggle that lets you switch between the Original Layout (side by side request and response sections) or, my favorite, the Chat Layout.

    How to use Qixplorer?

    The first thing you would need to create a new connection to your Qlik Cloud tenant is a Web Integration ID. You can grab that by going to your tenant’s Management Console, under Web, Create a new integration and add https://qixplorer.qlik.dev as an origin.

    Untitled2.png

    Once you have the generated ID in hand, create a new connection on Qixplorer as shown below:

    Untitled4.png

    The next step is to choose the app you want to connect to from the second dropdown.

    Once you select that, you will see that a first request and response have been made automatically. That’s the “OpenDoc” method, it is responsible for opening an app. More about it here.

    Notice that a few items are now highlighted on the Left panel that you can start using - including the Doc and Global classes that can be expanded to reveal all the methods you can execute. You can also use the pre-defined Macros to list sheets, dimensions etc...

    ⚠️Before we continue, keep in mind that when using Qixplorer, you are performing changes directly on your apps, so when executing API methods to update or delete within Qixplorer, it will affect the objects in your apps.

    Examples of using Qixplorer

     

    • Using Macros to list sheets in our app

    From the Macros dropdown, click on “ListSheets”.

    Notice that the Request section at the bottom has our generated JSON with the methods needed to list sheets.
    Click on Execute and view the JSON returned in the Response section.

    P.S: notice that two separate requests have been made by our Macro: CreateSessionObject and GetLayout.

    Untitled5.png

    • Using a method from Global

    Let’s create an App in our tenant directly from Qixplorer.

    First, select the “CreateApp” method from the Global dropdown.

    Notice that the right panel has been populated with the inline documentation for our method. This makes it really convenient to view the definition and parameters at a glance.

    Within the Request section that now contains the editable JSON, enter a name for the app we’re creating in the “qAppName” property.

    Our request and response look like this:

     

    {
      "handle": -1,
      "method": "CreateApp",
      "params": {
        "qLocale": "",
        "qLocalizedScriptMainSection": "",
        "qAppName": "test-qixplorer"
      }
    }

     

    Untitled (1).png

    You can check your tenant to view the newly created app:

    Untitled.png

     

    • Using a method from Doc and GenericObject

    Let’s retrieve the calculated data from a Table object in our app.

    First, we need to get the object. Under ”Doc”, scroll down to GetObject and change the “qId” property to our Table's object id.

    Now that we got the object, you can go to ”GenericObject”, then “Select Object” and click on table.

    Untitled (3).png

    Next, scroll down to the “GetHyperCubeData” method under “GenericObject” and modify the JSON as follows to set the qHeight (number of rows to retrieve) and qWidth (number of columns)

     

    {
      "handle": 2,
      "method": "GetHyperCubeData",
      "params": {
        "qPages": [
          {
            "qHeight": 1000,
            "qWidth": 5,
            "qTop": 0,
            "qLeft": 0
          }
        ],
        "qPath": "/qHyperCubeDef"
      }
    }

     

    Click on execute and examine the response:

    hypercube-anim.gif

    The Engine API is without a doubt very powerful as it exposes methods that can be used to tap directly into the associative engine and manipulate complex data structures. Having a tool like Qixplorer is a great way to try out the API and learn more about all the methods available in a single place.

    Let me know in the comments how you use Qixplorer on you end!

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