5 Replies Latest reply: Apr 6, 2017 10:34 AM by Peter Cammaert RSS

    How to automatically manage QV server log files

    David Wellman

      HI all,

       

      What approaches do people take to managing the various QV server log files, particularly deleting old files?

       

      Looking in the QMC there are appropriate options to control which log files I want created, how much information should they contain ("Event Log Verbosity") and how often new files are created ("Split Files").

       

      What I haven't found is anything that controls how long the log files should be kept for.

       

      Assuming that I haven't missed anything obvious, I'm guessing that people 'do their own thing'.

       

      What do you use to delete old log files?

       

      All suggestions much appreciated.

       

      Cheers,

      Dave

        • Re: How to automatically manage QV server log files
          Peter Cammaert

          Nothing really. The disk space used by the server log files is rather small when compared to what the Publisher uses (about 1:100). And the latter are being managed by the QMS itself which only keeps 30 days worth of task/document logs or whatever you configure in the QMS configuration file.

           

          You can however use a small cmd/powershell script to run every night and delete all logs that are older than a particular date. A few hints and examples:

           

          Limpando os logs do Distribution Service

          Qlik Sense Log Archiver / Eraser

           

          Adapt as needed.

            • Re: How to automatically manage QV server log files
              John Repucci

              In my instance, each day's logs are 320MB -> 340MB.(C:\ProgramData\QlikTech\DistributionService\1\Log)

              In addition, there are several other sets of logs files sprinkled throughout C:\ProgramData\QlikTech

               

              I run both UsageAnalyzer and Governance Dashboard.  It is nice to see the prior history, which I would lose if I cleaned up some of those file.

               

              John

              v12.10 SR4 server only, not using QVP

                • Re: How to automatically manage QV server log files
                  David Wellman

                  Hi John,

                   

                  Thanks for the comments. As per my reply to Peter's notes - at least I haven't missed anything! I understand about wanting to see previous history, but presumably there is a point when history is 'too old' to have any real meaning/value. And the definition of 'too old' is going to differ for different organisations and information, I don't think there is a single value.

                   

                  I'll look at the links that Peter included and will probably put something together.

                   

                  Once again many thanks.

                   

                  Cheers,

                  Dave

                • Re: How to automatically manage QV server log files
                  David Wellman

                  Hi Peter,

                   

                  Thanks for your comments. I understand your point about the relative size and agree with that. My question was more aimed at tidying up the server logs which can grow and become 'numerous'.

                   

                  From your reply (and John's below) at least it doesn't look like I've missed anything. I'll have a look at the links that you included and probably put something together.

                   

                  Once again many thanks.

                  Dave

                    • Re: How to automatically manage QV server log files
                      Peter Cammaert

                      Well, there was a time when QlikView used a directory called EDXResults (instead of the current EDXResult) to store the task execution status files. The directory wasn't managed like its counterpart is right now (30 days, nothing more), and for customers that ran some tasks every 5 minutes it quickly filled up with millions of small xml files. At that point, NTFS chokes and Windows Explorer took an awful lot of time to select-drop-display even 1000 files. That was the only time I ever considered writing some custom code to manage the content of one directory according to a strict ruleset.

                       

                      Luckily, Qlik implemented a sensible content management strategy in the QMS. And in the end it wouldn't have saved me a lot of disk space anyway.