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Employee
Employee

Natural Language Processing (NLP)

Quickly learn how Qlik unlocks analytics for more types of users with Natural Language Processing. Natural Language processing is an analytics feature available with our Insight Advisor – it is more than just a search box..watch the video to learn more. Comments, questions? Leave them below.  I want to hear from you.

 

5 Comments
Partner
Partner

Hi Michael,

It looks like a good feature that is added to the cloud based solutions, but could the technical side be explained a bit more? 

For instance, we know that it needs the correct master items / measures to work correctly. Mostly the same as training the Qlik Bot. But how is it handling the other words like 'show me'. Does that for instance need to be English? Or is this information not used and are only the dimensions and measures picked up from the master items? Meaning that other languages can also work with the NLP?

Jordy

Climber

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Employee
Employee

Hi Jordy - I will have more on this in another video - but you can setup up synonyms for Master Item Measures and Dimensions as well as fields defined in a load script. That way it will know if someone uses the measure Sales vs. Revenue etc.

10-14-2019 5-07-55 PM.png

 

Right now it is only available in English with more languages coming.

In regards to other terms like compare, show me, what is - I need to ask PM to see if there is any relevancy behind them. I tested a few without them and got expected results. 

You can see the words it recognizes by the bold type and if you click the information icon - it will show you what it learned / knows:

10-14-2019 5-10-38 PM.png

10-14-2019 4-55-35 PM.png

10-14-2019 4-56-30 PM.png

 

Hope this helps - let me know if you have any more questions.

Regards,

Mike

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Or
Valued Contributor II

@Michael_TaralloI'm actually also interested in how words are interpreted when they aren't a field / master item names or values. To use some examples, I would expect Natural Language Processing to be able to tell the difference between "Sales in 2018 compared to 2019" and "Combined Sales in 2018 and 2019", or to be able to parse statements like "Sales by Item for my ten biggest Customers" as being different from "Sales Item Customer" (Including being able to understand that "Customers" and "Customer" are the same thing in this context).

Interesting stuff...

 

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Employee
Employee

Hi Or  - thanks for your interest. We cover some of that in our help doc here:

 

https://help.qlik.com/en-US/cloud-services/Subsystems/Hub/Content/Sense_Hub/Visualizations/creating_...

 

There are words (semantics) that are ignored for example (Show me, what are,) and then there are analysis types (combine, compare, top) - certain phrases and semantics are passed to our natural language engine while others are passed to our cognitive engine to be processed accordingly to prepare the proper aggregations and chart types. 

 

From the help:

 

You can phrase your search query using natural language, Show me Sales for example.

 

Natural language queries need to reference field names or synonyms for field names in your data model.

 

You can tag master items with synonyms using tags on your master items. Use the format alt:<term> in synonym tags. For example, alt:cities. For more information, see Tagging master items .

 

Natural language queries support three kinds of filters:

 

  • Time: A unit of time or date. For example, Show me 2019 Sales.
  • Category: A value from one of the dimensions. For example, Show me Sales by Product for Sweden.
  • Measure: A value or values from a measure. For example, Show me Sales for Sweden by Product under 1K.

 

You can phrase your search queries for facts, comparisons, and rankings. Facts are statements such as What are my sales, or Show expenses over time for 2019. You can ask for a comparison by adding vs or compare to your query. For example, Compare sales to expenses over time.

 

Please note that we are adding to this over time - this is our first release so expect more "analysis types" to be available in future releases.

 

HTH - Let me know how else I can be of assistance.

 

Regards,

Mike

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Partner
Partner

Hi Michael,

Thanks for the explanation. I'm looking forward to the next video. 

Regarding the language, this will only impact the results that Qlik is giving back, right? Like in your screenshot that Qlik 'says' : Comparison of sum(Sales) and Margin for Country. It can't yet give this back in another language. Though, if I would change all my master measures and dimensions with a foreign name, it will give me this foreign name, but not the translation of 'Comparison of ... and.. for ...'

Jordy

Climber

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