Qlik Community

Welcome to Qlik Community

cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
2,011 online

Here you will find Qlik Sense resources, partake in interesting discussions, solve problems and foster relationships with Qlik experts from around the globe.

Thank you for joining us in the QlikView Forum, your home for QlikView answers. Discover insights within your data that can transform your business.

Direct links to other resources within the Qlik ecosystem. We suggest you bookmark this page.

Learn about upcoming Qlik related events, webinars and local meetups.

Join one of our Qlik Community Groups. Anyone can view content in Open Groups, but you must join to participate. Closed Groups require joining in order to view content and participate.

Hear directly from Qlik employees in our nine unique blogs. Check out the new Customer Success Blog!

Find a forum to ask a question or start a discussion.

Discussion Boards and Documents for Qlik Services.

Qlik partners with leading technology companies to develop integrations, extensions, and connectors to the Qlik platform.

Discussion board and documents related to Qlik Associative Big Data Index.

Learn about the Qlik Community. Explore 'How-To' documentation, ask questions, and engage in discussion around the community platform. This will also be the place where, from time to time, we will do some fun things.

Recent Discussions

  • New to Qlik Sense

    Create a flag for certain values

    Hi Qlik Users, I am looking to create a flag in the QlikSense dashboard. This is what I am looking for: (1) I am looking to create a filter eg: Flag =... Show More
    Hi Qlik Users, I am looking to create a flag in the QlikSense dashboard. This is what I am looking for: (1) I am looking to create a filter eg: Flag = 1, 0 which enables the user to select (2) create the flag = 1 (exclude values.) flag = 0 (include values) (3) For Flag = 1 - values like Fruit = 'Apple', 'Orange', 'Banana'. So the dashboard will change by excluding these fruits (4) For Flag = 0 - include all the fruits. Can anyone tell me how to achieve this using set analysis or any other method. Show Less
  • QlikView Scripting

    Tricky - Defining the 'four cheapest' products

    Hi there,I am facing a very special challenge: I need to develop a solution where the among a long list of products the "four cheapest" products will ... Show More

    Hi there,

    I am facing a very special challenge: I need to develop a solution where the among a long list of products the "four cheapest" products will be determined. Here are examples to explain how the "four cheapest" are defined:

    Examples_four_cheapest.JPG

     

     

     

     

     

     

    I tried approaches with min-, FirstSortedValue- and rank formulas, but didn't quite solve this. Now I appreciate your ideas. Thanks.

    Show Less
  • New to Qlik Sense

    Using Wildmatch to filter by X or Y

    I have this script that gives me count of various product categories containing nut and fruits. I need to adjust it to give me count of either Nut or ... Show More

    I have this script that gives me count of various product categories containing nut and fruits. I need to adjust it to give me count of either Nut or Fruit. Please advice.

    if(Wildmatch([Product],'*Nut*','*Fruit*')
    OR Wildmatch([Liq Products ],'*Nut*','*Fruit*')
    OR Wildmatch([Matched Products (All)],'*Nut*','*Fruit*'),
    'Has Fruit and nuts', 'Does not have both') as Product_Flag

    Show Less
  • New to Qlik Sense

    Issue with AGGR(field,field)

    Hi All,I have used AGGR(City,City) to hide the grey out values from Filter Pane but the concern over there is after using this expression I am not abl... Show More

    Hi All,

    I have used AGGR(City,City) to hide the grey out values from Filter Pane but the concern over there is after using this expression I am not able to select the multiple values at a time.

    Here I am not able to select multiple values at a time like City A and City D

    For eg.

    City Country

    A      1

    B       2

    C       3

    D      4

    Or is there any other alternative to remove the grey out values from Filterpane.

    Note: AGGR(City,City) is working in Qlikview (Listbox) but not in Qlik sense(filterpane). In Qlikview I am able to select multiple alternate values using ctrl button but not in Qlik Sense.

    Can this be a bug?

    Show Less
  • Qlik Education Discussions

    how to calculate amount based on discount %

    Dear Team, Hope you are doing well!!!!!!!!i Stuck a Requirement. i am calculating amount based on discount% as per given in excel.My Amount is 900000.... Show More

    Dear Team,

     

    Hope you are doing well!!!!!!!!

    i Stuck a Requirement. i am calculating amount based on discount% as per given in excel.My Amount is 900000.

    want to calculate amount based on slab no.1,Slab no.2 And Slab no.3.

    Means

    0-300000                             discount 35%               300000*.35=105000

    300000-500000                 discount 30%              100000*.30=30000

    500000-1000000                discount 25%             500000*.25=125000

     

    900000 lakh divided in three slabs.i am giving excel according to slab wise.kindly attached the excel.

     

    Show Less
  • Qlik Education Discussions

    how to calculate amount based on discount%

    Dear Team, Hope you are doing well!!!!!!!!i Stuck a Requirement. i am calculating amount based on discount% as per given in excel.My Amount is 900000.... Show More

    Dear Team,

     

    Hope you are doing well!!!!!!!!

    i Stuck a Requirement. i am calculating amount based on discount% as per given in excel.My Amount is 900000.

    want to calculate amount based on slab no.1,Slab no.2 And Slab no.3.

    Means

    0-300000                             discount 35%               300000*.35=105000

    300000-500000                 discount 30%              100000*.30=30000

    500000-1000000                discount 25%             500000*.25=125000

     

    900000 lakh divided in three slabs.i am giving excel according to slab wise.kindly attached the excel.

     

    Show Less
  • QlikView App Development

    SAP BW: hide value of compounded infoobject in Qlik

    Good DayI am very new to Qlik.We uploaded BW data to QlikSense. In BW Query (formerly BEx) I have set the properties on infoobject 0CO_AREA to "no dis... Show More

    Good Day

    I am very new to Qlik.

    We uploaded BW data to QlikSense. In BW Query (formerly BEx) I have set the properties on infoobject 0CO_AREA to "no display". This infoobject is the compounded one of 0COSTCENTER.

    Anyway, in Qlik this property seems to be ignored.

    Now I need the right script to hide this value in Qlik.

    Example:

    0COSTCENTER:

    1000/5000000001 -> 5000000001.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks

    Tom

    Show Less
  • New to Qlik Sense

    Totally Lost - Is there any way to rename sums to a ranking? As in highest sum s...

    I have a table with sums and I am wanting the highest sum for the question in the column to say 1, second highest to say 2, 3rd highest to say 3...etc... Show More

    I have a table with sums and I am wanting the highest sum for the question in the column to say 1, second highest to say 2, 3rd highest to say 3...etc. 

    Show Less
  • Qlik Connectors Discussions

    No refresh_token found error on Connector Version: 1.0.3.26574

    We recently upgraded to Connector Version: 1.0.3.26574We are seeing an error with multiple users, when attempting to get a new authentication code for... Show More

    We recently upgraded to Connector Version: 1.0.3.26574

    We are seeing an error with multiple users, when attempting to get a new authentication code for Office 365 Sharepoint Connector. This needs to be done after network password is updated, to get a new authentication code.

    The error is : "No refresh_token found"

    We are following processes that worked fine on the previous version of the connector that we were using prior to this. I am able to successfully log in via the pop up window after going to :

    Connectors > Qlik Office 365 Sharepoint Connector > Tables: CanAuthenticate >

    and clearing the old token, and then attempting to authenticate to get a new authentication code. The sharepoint login is fine and I get a code in the new window, but the code does not work and gives the "No refresh_token found" error when I "save inputs & run table".   Is anyone else on this connector version seeing this issue? I searched and there is no info on this error code available except a 2016 community post with no solution.

     

    There is a new parameter in this version, called "prompt / consent level" and I have tried both options and they do not affect the error.

    Show Less
  • Technology Partners Ecosystem Discussions

    Top 5 data visualization best practices you need to remember

                  Top 5 data visualization best practices you need to rememberData visualization can save us from drowning. The tsunami of data that flood... Show More

    top-5-best-practices-linkedin

                  Top 5 data visualization best practices you need to remember

    Data visualization can save us from drowning. The tsunami of data that floods our daily lives is on the rise. By 2025 we can expect up to 463 exabytes of data to permeate our daily existence! (Bear in mind that 1 exabyte = 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes!)

    Data visualization is the life-preserver we need to manage the heavy-data load, since human processing power falls slightly short of machine learning speeds! Humans do, luckily, respond to and process visual data faster – up to 60 000 times faster than text. The visual medium is natural to us. As a result, businesses can use data visualization to break down vast complex data into bite-size chunks we can understand at a glance.

     

    And there’s potentially more to the subject, a recent Forbes article observes: “Data analysis isn’t just about assembling, ordering and interpreting data; it’s also about educating, simplifying, clarifying, and persuading.”

     

    This raises an important point—persuasion. A visualization needs to be informative but it should also persuade people to take a particular action or decision. The decision may pertain to everyday business or something that affects people on a global scale, like climate change awareness. The bottom line is, data visualization has the power to change people’s perception.

     

    Creating a visualization that steers business decisions or changes the world, begins with a few basics. Here are five best practices to consider when you craft your next visualization:

     

    1. Communicate to a specific audience

     

    When you’re designing a data visualization, you need to know the specific audience you’ll be communicating with. Knowing this helps you to aim the data story at them and speak to their specific needs. Aim it at the highest level persona who will view the visualization and make sure their needs are covered and the common roadblocks they encounter.

     

    Creating a visualization that communicates with a broad audience may result in it being ineffective and could reduce the likelihood of extracting key business insights.

     

    Once you’ve established who your audience is, consider what decision you want them to make from the data. And the nature of their decision. Different roles or functions in a business make decisions differently. C-level executives tend to make strategic decisions. These are usually one-off type decisions. Whereas an Operations Manager has to continually make decisions based on daily operational choices.

     

    Illustration credit:

     

    Taking into account these decision-making elements, you can then align the data visualization accordingly. Strategic decision-making may require more complex visuals, while for operations, a binary-type interface would suit simple yes-no decisions. The time scale should also be adjusted to display a scale relevant to the decision type.

     

    Now that we’ve got the audience nailed down, let’s look at the visual aspects involved.

     

    2. Choose the best visual

     

    It’s important to choose a visualization that will communicate the right message to your audience. When you’ve got this covered, your audience will quickly understand your point and extract the insights they need.

     

    Each type of visualization works best with a particular data type. These data types could include:

    1. Categorical data, also called qualitative data, represents characteristics like a person’s gender or age and is non numeric. 
    2. Ordinal data is a sub-category of categorical data. Ordinal data is also non-numeric but the order of the data matters like in surveys or questionnaires. 
    3. Quantitative data, also called numerical data, is measured in numbers, like length or revenue.

     

    Let’s take a look at the visuals that pair with these data types.

     

    • Tables can display large quantities of data, categorical or quantitative. If the audience only needs to see a high-level view of the data, the table format may be overwhelming.

     

    Vizlib Table

     

    • Bar charts measure categorical or quantitative data and are a good way to compare the quantities of different categories.

    Vizlib Bar Chart

     

    • Line charts use ordinal or quantitative data. They track change over time and the relationship between two variables.

     

    Vizlib Line Chart

     

    • Area charts measure ordinal, categorical or quantitative data. They are similar to line charts, with the area beneath the line shaded in.

     

    • Pie and donut charts demonstrate categorical data. They show the comparison between the parts of a whole. Make sure you label the individual wedges so it’s clear which pieces are larger. And don’t compare two pie charts alongside each other that have different totals!

    Vizlib Pie Chart

     

    • Scatterplots reflect quantitative, ordinal or categorical data and show the values of two variables against two axes. The pattern of the results shows the relationship between the variables. You can also demonstrate the relationship by the size of the data bubbles.

    Vizlib Scatter Chart

     

    • Heatmaps measure categorical and quantitative data. They show a graphical representation of data with individual values represented by a specific color.

     

     

    Vizlib Heatmap

    3. Use proper design principles

     

    It’s imperative to keep the dashboard simple and uncluttered. Much like any visual presentation, too much clutter will disperse the viewer’s attention and leave them feeling confused and frustrated. They should be able to grasp the high-level meaning of the visualization at a glance if you adhere to a few basic design principles.

     

    Create digestible designs

    Firstly, the design must be digestible – quick and easy to understand. Keep the design clean. Instead of trying to jam too much into one visualization, rather create an additional object. Another way to limit the clutter and deliver a better user experience is to include alternative dimensions and measures.

     

    Secondly, consider adopting every good designers’ passion for white space. White space, or the space around objects, gives the eye a rest and allows your focus to fall where it should, on your visualization objects. It allows the viewer to understand what they see more easily and creates a better user experience!

     

    Image credit: storytellingwithdata.com (showing the power of white space)

      Managing color

    Color usage is an important design factor in visualizations. Use colors to differentiate visual elements and make your data story as clear as possible. You could combine colors and shapes for your indicators, like a green empty triangle and a red full triangle, for additional visual clarity. Perhaps try using different line styles and different colors with your line graphs. And remember to use a palette that is color-blind friendly to ensure there are no accessibility issues with your visuals. If you’d like to learn more about selecting the ideal color palette, read our guide here.

     

    Visual layout

    The layout of visualization elements, like icons and filters, should enhance learning. Ensure you position them in a way that reflects the correct hierarchy of information.

     

    Placing them on the left-hand side of the dashboard is a good idea as users look to the left first for important elements like filters or navigation tiles. The further right you place objects, the less attention the viewer pays to them. The best layout of the main filters or icons is stacked vertically on the left.

     

    A horizontal arrangement is also workable. Placing icons or filters on top allows more space for visualizations. Note that viewers will consider the first icon in the horizontal display as the most important.

     

    Together with positioning, you could also show the importance of data by the size of the chart or text. Make the key objects larger to draw the audience’s attention.

     

    Maximizing understanding

    Lastly, the design should maximize understanding and provide a great user experience that is not overwhelming. You could implement this principle by labeling data directly, rather than using a legend and including annotations on your visualization. And, only include visualizations that serve a purpose. This will cut down on distractions and allow the viewer to focus on the key message in your data.

    Image credit: storytellingwithdata.com

      4. Provide context for the visualization

     

    The most effective data story-telling always contextualizes the data. Contextualizing refers to showing the bigger picture, the story that surrounds a situation. Framing the data, by including context like annotations, makes it easier to understand. When viewers grasp what they’re seeing, they can interpret it correctly. As a result, you establish their trust.

     

    It’s vital that business leaders understand visualizations at a glance and trust the insights to make their recommendations. Once trust is established, they’ll be more likely to take the action you want them to.

     

    You can contextualize data by comparing your metrics to something tangible like a goal. If you can present metrics in comparison with dynamic thresholds, it’ll make the data easier to interpret.

     

    An additional way to provide context is by including annotations. Annotations, like text labels, tooltips or icons, are visual cues for the viewer and make the visualization quicker and easier to grasp. Annotations help explain large shifts or changes in the metrics. They will also help the viewer stay focused on the visualization's main message.

     

    Vizlib Line Chart with annotations

     

    5. Avoid common pitfalls

     

    Applying best practices will help you master your data visualization skills. And by avoiding common pitfalls you’ll be well on your way to even more effective data story-telling. Look out for these potential glitches when creating or collaborating on visualizations:

     

    • Avoid using too much color. Stick to the fundamental rule—keep it simple. Simplicity leads to understanding and keeps your audience on board.
    • Don’t try to embellish the data. Make sure it is transparent.
    • Ensure the data is correct! And that the parts add up to the total figure.
    • Label the data correctly to avoid confusion and losing your audience.
    • Don’t truncate a graph’s axes as it may distort the data representation and minimize the impact of your message.

    Data visualizations should be simple and persuasive. Follow these best practices to shape the mind of your audience! You’ll be empowering them to take insightful action in their business or perhaps to change the world!

     

    Here are a few additional examples of Vizlib data visualizations.

    Vizlib data visualization dashboards

     

    Get started with a free Vizlib trial!

     

    Show Less

Blogs

Qlik Community Manager Blogs

Hear from the Qlik Community team about the latest platform enhancements, announcements, and more.

Blogs

Qlik Support Updates Blog

Read the latest blogs from Qlik Support and get important and useful support information.

Blogs

Blogs

Hear directly from Qlik employees and stay current on the latest and greatest information about Qlik products.

Groups

Join a Group

Join one of our Qlik Community user groups around an Industry, Location & Language, or Topic.

Groups

Qlik Deployment Framework

This group hosts information related to the Qlik Deployment Framework (QDF).

2700+ Members

Groups

Qlik Healthcare

This group is for healthcare organizations, partners, and Qlik healthcare staff to collaborate and share insights.

750+ Members

Events

Qlik Insider Webinar

Join the last Qlik Insider Webinar of 2019, where our experts will discuss the latest features and capabilities in Qlik's platform.

November 20, 2019 Webinar

Events

Events & Meetups

Participate in an upcoming local Qlik Meetup


Events

Qlik Data Revolution Tour

Discover how to transform your entire data value chain for deep insights at unprecedented speed.

Find a location One Day Event