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Qlik Academic Program Blog

This forum was created for professors and students using Qlik within academia.

Qlik Product Innovation Blog

Learn about what's new across all of the products in our growing Qlik product portfolio.

Support Updates Blog

Important and useful support information about end-of-product support, new service releases, and general support topics.

Qlik Design Blog

All about product and Qlik solutions: scripting, data modeling, visual design, extensions, best practices, etc.

Community Manager Blog

Updates about Qlik Community Platform as well as news and announcements.

Qlik Education Blog

On this forum you can access and follow the latest updates of our courses and programs with the Qlik Education team.

Qlik Design Blog

All about product and Qlik solutions: scripting, data modeling, visual design, extensions, best practices, etc.

Qlik Technical Bulletin Blog

Information on all new product releases, connectors, beta programs, and technical product information.

Qlik Architecture Deep Dive Blog

Deep dives into specific back-end technologies which allow for the extension of Qlik to fit the needs of the enterprise.

Qlik Customer Success Blog

All about Qlik's Voice of the Customer program and Customer Success initiatives

Product Insight Blog

Learn about what's new in the Qlik Product Insight & Ideas forum.

Recent Blog Posts

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    Qlik Design Blog

    Using Color Functions in Qlik Sense

    When developing a Qlik Sense app, there will come a time where you are going to want to define your own colors for certain values in a visualization. Did you know that Qlik Sense offers many ways to achieve your desired outcome?
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    Support Updates Blog

    The Entitlement Analyzer for Qlik Sense Enterprise SaaS customers is available N...

    Hello Qlik Users!  How can I track the usage of my Tenant over time? How are my entitled users using the Tenant?  How can I better understand the usage of Analyzer Capacity vs. Analyzer & Professional Entitlements?  These are a couple of the questions we frequently hear. To enable you to find better answers for those, we are happy to share with you the new Entitlement Analyzer for Qlik Sense Enterprise SaaS!  The Entitlement Analyzer will help an... Show More

    Hello Qlik Users! 

    How can I track the usage of my Tenant over time? How are my entitled users using the Tenant? 

    How can I better understand the usage of Analyzer Capacity vs. Analyzer & Professional Entitlements? 

    These are a couple of the questions we frequently hear. To enable you to find better answers for those, we are happy to share with you the new Entitlement Analyzer for Qlik Sense Enterprise SaaS! 

    Entitlement Analyzer.pngThe Entitlement Analyzer will help answer those questions and more! The app provides insights on: 

    • Entitlement usage overview across the Tenant 
    • Analyzer Capacity – Detailed usage data and a predication if you have enough 
    • Understand how users are using the system and if they have the right Entitlement assigned to them 
    • And much more! 

     

    (Available sheets)(Available sheets)

     

    The Entitlement Analyzer uses a new API Endpoint to fetch all the required data and will store the history in QVD files to enable even better Analytics over time. 

     A few things to note: 

    • This app is provided as-is and is not supported by Qlik Support. 
    • It is recommended to always use the latest app. 
    • Information is not collected by Qlik when using this app. 

     

    The app as well as the configuration guide can be found at the bottom of this post. This app was created internally and will be supported by the developers of the app. They will be following this thread so be sure to post any questions or issues here so they can be addressed. 

    Be sure to subscribe to the Qlik Support Updates Blog by clicking the green Subscribe button to stay up-to-date with the latest Qlik Support announcements. Please give this post a like if you found it helpful! 

    Kind regards, 

    Qlik Digital Support Team 

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    Support Updates Blog

    Qlik Sense Migration Part 1: Migrating your Entire Qlik Sense Environment

    Hi everyone,For various and valid reasons, you might need to migrate your entire Qlik Sense environment, or part of it, somewhere else. In this post, I’ll cover the most common scenario: a complete migration of a single or multi-node Qlik Sense system, with the bundled PostgreSQL database (Qlik Sense Repository Database service) in a new environment. So, how do we do that? Introduction and preparationBackup your old environmentDeploy and restore ... Show More

    Hi everyone,

    For various and valid reasons, you might need to migrate your entire Qlik Sense environment, or part of it, somewhere else.

    In this post, I’ll cover the most common scenario: a complete migration of a single or multi-node Qlik Sense system, with the bundled PostgreSQL database (Qlik Sense Repository Database service) in a new environment.

    So, how do we do that?

    1. Introduction and preparation
    2. Backup your old environment
    3. Deploy and restore the new central node
    4. What about my rim nodes?
    5. Finalizing your migration

     Introduction and preparation

     

    Let’s start with a little bit of context: Say that we are running a 3 nodes Qlik Sense environment (Central node / Proxy-Engine node / Scheduler node).

    On the central node, I also have the Qlik shared folder and the bundled Qlik Sense Repository Database installed.

    This environment has been running well for years but I now need to move it to a brand new hardware ensuring better performance. It’s not possible to reinstall everything from scratch because the system has been heavily used and customized already. Redoing all of that to replicate the environment is too difficult and time-consuming.  

    I start off with going through a checklist to verify if the new system I’m migrating to is up to it:

    And then I move right over to…

     

    Backup your old environment

     

    The first step to migrate your environment in this scenario is to back it up.

    To do that, I would recommend following the steps documented on help.qlik.com (make sure to select your Qlik Sense version top left of the screen).

    https://help.qlik.com/en-US/sense/April2019/Subsystems/PlanningQlikSenseDeployments/Content/Sense_Deployment/Backing-up-a-site.htm

    Once the backup is done you should have:

    • A backup of the database in .tar format
    • A backup of the content of the file share which includes your applications, application content, archived logs, extensions,…
    • Backups of any data source files that need to be migrated and are not stored in the shared folder like QVDs

    Then we can go ahead and…

     

    Deploy and restore the new central environment

     

    The next steps are to deploy and restore your central node. In this scenario, we will also assume that the new central node will have a different name than the original one (just to make things a bit more complicated 😊).

    Let’s start by installing Qlik Sense on the central node. That’s as straightforward as any other fresh install.

    You can follow our documentation. Before clicking on Install simply uncheck the box “Start the Qlik Sense services when the setup is complete.

    The version of Qlik Sense you are going to install MUST be the same as the one the backup is taken on.  

    Now that Qlik Sense is deployed you can restore the backup you have taken earlier into your new Qlik Sense central node following Restoring a Qlik Sense site.

    Since the central node server name has also changed, you need to run a Bootstrap command to update Qlik Sense with the new server name. Instruction provided in Restoring a Qlik Sense site to a machine with a different hostname.

    The central node is now almost ready to start.

    If you have changed the Qlik Share location, then the UNC path has also changed and needs to be updated.

    To do that

    • Go to C:\Program Files\Qlik\Sense\Repository\Util\QlikSenseUtil
    • Run QlikSenseUtil.exe as Administrator
    • Click on Connect to the database and enter the credential to connect to the new PostgreSQL database
    • Click on Service Cluster and press OK. This should display the previously configured UNC Path
    • You simply need to update each path, save and start/restart all the Qlik sense services.

    01.png

    At this point make sure you can access the Qlik Sense QMC and Hub on the central node. Eventually, check that you can load applications (using the central node engine of course). You can also check in the QMC -> Service Cluster that the changes you previously made have been correctly applied.

    Troubleshooting tips: If after starting the Qlik Sense services, you cannot access the QMC and/or Hub please check the following knowledge article How to troubleshoot issue to access QMC and HUB

     

    What about my rim nodes?

     

    You’ve made it here?! Then congratulation you have passed the most difficult part.

    If you had already running and configured rim nodes in your environment that you now need to migrate as well, you might not want to remove them from Qlik Sense to add the new ones since you will lose pretty much all the configuration you have done so far on these rim nodes.

    By applying the following few steps I will show you how to connect to your “new” rim node(s) and keep the configuration of the “old” one(s).

    Let’s start by installing Qlik Sense on each rim node like it was a new one.

    The process is pretty much the same as installing a central node except that instead of choosing “Create Cluster”, you need to select “Join Cluster

    Detailed instruction can be found on help.qlik.com - Installing Qlik Sense in a multi-node site

    Once Qlik Sense is installed on your future rim node(s) and the services are started, we will need to connect to the “new” Qlik Sense Repository Database and change the hostname of the “old” rim node(s) to the “new” one so that the central node can communicate with it.

    To do that install PGAdmin4 and connect to the Qlik Sense Repository Database. Detailed instruction in Installing and Configuring PGAdmin 4 to access the PostgreSQL database used by Qlik Sense or NPrinting knowledge article.

    Once connected navigate to Databases -> QSR -> Schemas -> public -> Tables

    You need to edit the LocalConfigs and ServerNodeConfigurations table and change the Hostname of your rim node(s) from the old one to the new corresponding one (Don’t forget to Save the change)

    LocalConfigs table

    02.png

     

    ServerNodeConfigurations table

    03.png

     

    Once this is done, you will need to restart all the services on the central node.

    When you have access back, login to the QMC and go to Nodes. Your rim node(s) should display the following status, “The certificate has not been installed

    04.png

     

    From this point, you can simply select the node, click on Redistribute and follow the instruction to deploy the certificates on your rim node. After a moment the status should change and you should see the services being up and running.

    Do the same thing on the remaining rim node(s).

    Troubleshooting tips: If the rim node status is not showing “The certificate has not been installed” it means that either the central node cannot reach the rim node or the rim node is not ready to receive new certificates.

    Check that the port 4444 is opened between the central and rim node and make sure the rim node is listening on port 4444 (netstat -aon in command prompt)

    Still no luck?! You can completely uninstall Qlik Sense on the rim node and reinstall it.

     

    Finalizing your migration

     

    At this point, your environment is completely migrated and most of the stuff should work.

    Data Connection

    There is one thing to consider in this scenario. Since the Qlik Sense certificates between the old environment and the new one are not the same, it is likely that data connections with passwords will fail.  This is because passwords are saved in the repository database with encryption.  That encryption is based on a hash from the certs.  When the Qlik Sense self-signed cert is rebuilt, this hash is no longer valid, and so the saved data connection passwords will fail.  You will need to re-enter the passwords in each data connection and save.  This can be done in the QMC -> Data Connections.

    See knowledge article: Repository System Log Shows Error "Not possible to decrypt encrypted string in database"

    Licensing

    Do not forget to turn off your old Qlik Sense Environment. As per your license agreement, you can only use one license per active Qlik Sense environment. Reach out to your account manager for more details.

    Best practices

    Finally, don’t forget to apply best practices in your new environment:

     

    Thank you for reading my blog post and I really hope it helps you. This is the first part of a post covering multiple migration scenarios. Coming soon,  I will explain how to migrate your PostgreSQL Database from the bundled Qlik Sense Repository Database to a dedicated PostgreSQL Instance.

    I’ll be watching for your questions, feedback or suggestions so please comment and share (and like if you liked 😊)!  

     

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    Qlik Academic Program Blog

    Students securing opportunities after learning from the Qlik Academic Program

    Increasingly, students enrolled into the Qlik Academic Program have at their disposal various opportunities to forward their career. Students are securing internships and jobs within Qlik and with customers and partners of Qlik across the globe.The academic program provides free resources in the form of online training, qualifications and certification to students and professors. The program offers structured pathways to become a Qlik Sense Busin... Show More

    Increasingly, students enrolled into the Qlik Academic Program have at their disposal various opportunities to forward their career. Students are securing internships and jobs within Qlik and with customers and partners of Qlik across the globe.

    The academic program provides free resources in the form of online training, qualifications and certification to students and professors. The program offers structured pathways to become a Qlik Sense Business Analyst and Qlik Sense Data Architect after which students can appear for the exams and get their certifications. This program has been quite popular with more than 26,000 students from 2400+ Universities leveraging these free resources. Being industry developed makes it more relevant to the market demands.

    Relationship between National University of Singapore ( NUS) has been thriving and students from National University of Singapore (NUS)  have enrolled into the program quite regularly. The Singapore office of Qlik has recruited from the University which has resulted in a successful partnership between Qlik and NUS. The academic program continued to build engagement with NUS with various initiatives.

    Another recent example is that of Sri Vishnu Educational Society ( SVES) in India which has more than 250 students and Professors enrolled into the Qlik Academic Program. Data analytics start up Diagonal wanted to recruit Qlik trained students for its expansion plans. The company consults technology clients in data analytics and for its projects and they wanted students who are up to speed in analytics and Qlik technologies so that they could be deployed on their projects immediately. The academic program was supportive of this initiative and facilitated the engagement between BVRIT and Diagonal.

    Qlik has an R&D Centre in Bangalore and they have a continuous requirement of qualified candidates. Recently, they advertised their requirement for interns for their R&D projects. These projects are great opportunities for students to learn latest advancements in analytics technologies and fast forward their career. With the help of the academic program, the R&D team at Qlik are able to meet their requirements.

    Many such opportunities are sprouting for students across the globe and the Qlik Academic Program continues to bridge the skills gaps for analytics trained resources. If you are a student or Professor and wish to know about the academic program and learn from its free resources, visit: qlik.com/academicprogram or email: academicprogram@qlik.com  

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    Qlik Product Innovation Blog

    Move QlikView Bookmarks to the Qlik Sense Hub to Accelerate Your Cloud Transitio...

    We’re happy to announce the availability of QlikView Object Migration for Cloud. This free utility gives QlikView customers using the Qlik Sense Cloud Hub the ability to migrate server bookmarks from on-premises QlikView deployments to Qlik Sense Enterprise SaaS tenants to save you time and provide users with a more customized experience. 
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    Qlik Design Blog

    P&L Pivot Chart Extension

    Several years ago, I blogged about how I used IntervalMatch to create a profit and loss statement. Now that Qlik Sense has the P&L Pivot chart extension in the visualization bundle, I decided to test out the extension to see how it may help create a P&L report in Qlik Sense. This blog will review some of my findings and what was involved to create the P&L Pivot chart shown below.  The P&L Pivot chart extension provides a lot of properties that al... Show More

    Several years ago, I blogged about how I used IntervalMatch to create a profit and loss statement. Now that Qlik Sense has the P&L Pivot chart extension in the visualization bundle, I decided to test out the extension to see how it may help create a P&L report in Qlik Sense. This blog will review some of my findings and what was involved to create the P&L Pivot chart shown below.

     

    chart.png

     

    The P&L Pivot chart extension provides a lot of properties that allow you to change the style and coloring in the chart. You can find a complete list of the properties here in Qlik Help. The chart above uses one dimension and 6 measures but I could have used up to 9 measures with my single dimension or used 2 dimensions and up to 8 measures. After loading the data into Qlik Sense, my next step was to create a style template that I could use to handle the formatting of the chart.  Here is a snapshot of the template in Excel:

     

    template.png

     

    I added a header row so that I could easily see what options I could set but it is not required and can be omitted. In the styling template, Column A should include the data that is in the first dimension of the chart you will be applying the template to. Note that this data is case sensitive.  The other columns have the various styles that can be modified via the template.

     

    Here is an example of the same template in a CSV file.

     

    csv.png

     

    If a template is used, it needs to be loaded via the script. Here is how you can load the Excel and CSV versions of the templates:

     

    Excel:

     

    excel script.png

     

    CSV:

     

    csv script.png

     

    The key in both scripts is that the entire template needs to be loaded into one field which can later be selected from the Style template field drop down in the Properties window of the P&L Pivot chart. In the Excel script, the styles are concatenated into one field separated by semi-colons. In the CSV file, the file format is set to Fixed record to load all the data into one field. Note that the name that you give the field in the script will be the template name you select from the Style template field drop down.

     

    Each row of the template should have this format:

     

    DimensionValue;Bold;Background;FontStyle;TextColor;Align;FontSize;Comment

     

    • DimensionValue is the data value of the dimension in the row that you would like the change
    • Bold is used to bold the text in a row
    • Background is used to set the background color of a row
    • FontStyle is used to change the font style of a row to italic or oblique
    • TextColor is used to change the default black font color of a row to white
    • Align is used to set the alignment to center
    • FontSize is used to change the font size of a row
    • Comment is used to replace all zeros with a space

     

    Check Qlik Help to see the default and styling options that are available in the styling template.

     

    There are many additional properties that can be set in the properties window of the P&L Pivot chart extension. I kept many of the defaults but here are some that I changed. In the Table Format section of the Properties, I checked Indent to indent the P&L Heading. The columns can be narrow so I moved the Column width slider all the way to the right, (for max width), and changed the Font family so that I could see as much of the numeric values in the chart as possible. I tweaked the header coloring in the Header format section. I opted not to color variances below 0% red because then I would lose some of my styling template changes. While I used a styling template in my example, you do not have to. The P&L Pivot chart extension can be styled via the Properties window without using a template.

     

    The P&L Pivot chart extension provides a ton of styling options that can be used to easily make your profit and loss statement looks exactly the way you want. It is worth checking out or you can watch this video to learn more.

     

    Thanks,

    Jennell

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    Qlik Design Blog

    Building a Visual Text Analytics app using Qlik and Machine Learning techniques ...

    Welcome to the 2nd part of developing a Visual Text Analytics app using Qlik’s open-sourced solutions and a Word embedding technique(Word2Vec). In our previous tutorial , we designed a simple architecture(seen below) for the application that we will learn to develop today. Now, let us try to understand the need for each of these components and their role in our app.Front-end : This is the UI of the app that will help the user interact and derive ... Show More

    Welcome to the 2nd part of developing a Visual Text Analytics app using Qlik’s open-sourced solutions and a Word embedding technique(Word2Vec). In our previous tutorial , we designed a simple architecture(seen below) for the application that we will learn to develop today.

    Dipankar_Mazumdar_0-1626806540354.png

     

    Now, let us try to understand the need for each of these components and their role in our app.

    • Front-end : This is the UI of the app that will help the user interact and derive insights.

    • Back-end : Consists of 2 sub-components.

      • Client-side - This is where we have the Qlik’s visualization libraries Nebula and Picasso.js. 

      • Server-side - develop the APIs here.

     

    CLIENT-SIDE:

    So, why do we use two charting libraries from Qlik? Let’s break it down.

    For me, when I develop a full-stack solution, I think one of the things that I look into is how to build things quickly and efficiently. Since I have a lot of other components to develop or work with, I want to make sure I don’t end up devoting a significant amount of time to building things from scratch. Nebula.js helps me in this case. It allows me to quickly embed a chart that has already been developed in a Qlik Sense app and use it in my way. All I have to do is to render it in my Visual Analytics app with something like this -

    nuked.render({
    
        element: document.querySelector(".object"),
    
        id: "XHRqzeG"
    
      })

     

    The second visualization library that I leverage here is  Picasso.js. Picasso enables me to build custom, interactive, component-based visualizations. One of the things that I was looking for with this specific solution was to process textual data, specifically do the word embeddings and return the result of the word embedding to a chart so it helps me in presenting the data visually (note that we are developing a Visual Analytics app). 

    This is where Picasso.js fits in. It has a similar way of working as D3.js and allows me to work with 2D matrix and array of Objects. I can also use the data as I want in various components of the chart, making it very flexible. Here’s a snippet of how I used my transformed data in a Bar chart.

    Dipankar_Mazumdar_1-1626806540367.png

     

    .then(response => response.json())
    
          .then(data => {
    
            var js_data = [data];
    
    picasso.chart({
    
              element: document.querySelector(".container"),
    
              data: [{              
    
                  type: "matrix",
    
                  data: data
    
                }]
    
    })
    
    });

    Great! So, the gist is -

    • Nebula.js - embed already developed Qlik Sense charts (it is quick and easy). Also allows for selections & Qlik specific features.

    • Picasso.js - develop a customized chart (use data as we would like to build various chart components)

     

    SERVER-SIDE:

    The major chunk of our backend is the Server-side component where we develop our APIs. We use the Express.js framework here that helps us to manage routes, requests, etc. 

    What specific APIs do we have in this app?

    • /wordembed : This is the API to perform word embedding using Word2Vec. In this case, we take advantage of the NPM package(https://www.npmjs.com/package/word2vec) which provides a Node.js interface to Google’s Word2Vec implementation. We will be sending the results of the embedding to a Picasso Bar chart.

    • /data : Read data processed from Python’s implementation of Principal Component Analysis(PCA) and send it back to a Picasso Scatter plot to visualize the principal components.


    Alright! So, we have everything that we need component-wise. Now, let’s quickly understand two things and their need in this solution -

    1. Word Embedding - Word2Vec

    2. Principal Component Analysis(PCA)

    This is where the Machine Learning part comes to play and is key to developing a Visual Text Analytics app like this one. 

    Since this tutorial is not focused on the implementation of word embeddings/Word2Vec but rather touches upon it from more of an application perspective, we will not delve into details. Simply put, word embedding captures the essence of a word, i.e. their meanings, context, and semantic relationships and converts them into numerical representation (a vector). 

    For e.g. the word ‘sativa’ can be represented by something like this :

    sativa -0.441052 -0.247968 0.463302 0.086262. Please note that the vectors are generally very high-dimensional (in our case we have 300 dimensions).

    So, how do we get these vectors?

    To derive the vectors, we use the word2vec function like below where

    const w2v = require("word2vec");
    w2v.word2vec("cleared_word_embedding.txt", "vectors.txt", 
    { size: 300 }, () => {
    console.log("generated");
    }
    );

    These vector representations can then be applied to some interesting use-cases. One of the key tasks that we do by using the vectors in this project is to calculate similarities between words (commonly calculated using  cosine_similarity). So, in the front-end, we allow users to input any word of their choice and they will be visually presented with a chart representing the most similar words. Something like this:

    Dipankar_Mazumdar_2-1626806540367.png

     

    This is extremely beneficial for performing text-based analysis. For example, if a user searches for the word ‘citrus’, our Visual Analytics app will present something like this:

    Dipankar_Mazumdar_3-1626806540369.png

     

    Here we can see that the context of the word is maintained by the word embedding model and the user is returned with the top 5 most similar words(in descending order) - which are flavors again. If the user wants to then continue their analysis with any other flavor, they can start with the relevant & similar ones. Our API looks like below:

    app.post("/wordembed", (req, res)=>{
    
      var val = req.body.hi
    
      const w2v = require("word2vec");
    
      w2v.loadModel("vectors.txt", (error, model) => {
    
      var sim = model.mostSimilar(val, 5)
    
     res.send(sim);
    
    });
    
    })

     

    The second part is the Principal Component Analysis(PCA) part. PCA is a technique used to reduce the dimensionality of a high-dimensional dataset (like text, images). As high-dimensional data is very difficult to analyze and visualize, an ideal choice would be to reduce the dimensions by preserving as much information as possible. 

    Right, but why do we use it in this project? 

    I wanted to allow users to visualize the words in our vocabulary in 2-dimension so they can explore similarities between them effectively. The best way was to present this information in a Scatter plot. For this specific project, I used the  sklearn’s python implementation of PCA and imported the coordinates in my /data API like below:

    app.get("/data",(req, res)=>{
      
    const path = require('path');
    const csv = require('fast-csv');
    const data = []
    fs.createReadStream(path.resolve(__dirname, '../pca_words.csv'))
        .pipe(csv.parse({ headers: true }))
        .on('error', (error) => console.error(error))
        .on('data', (row) => 
            data.push(row)
        	)
        .on('end', () => {
      res.send(data);
      })
      
    })

     

    Here is the visualization for the PCA projection.

    Dipankar_Mazumdar_4-1626806540724.gif

     

    As you can see, words such as ‘depression’, ‘appetite’, ‘relief’ are in close proximity since they are similar. Logically that makes sense as well since these are a couple of things that can be treated using the strains.

    Here is the application in action:

     

    Dipankar_Mazumdar_5-1626806540877.gif

     

    This brings us to the end of this tutorial on developing a Visual Text Analytics app using Qlik’s open-sourced solutions and Machine Learning techniques such as Word embeddings.

    Want to get started building such an app? Here is a  Glitch for developers to remix.

    PS: you will not be able to see the visualizations when you open the Glitch due to authentication reasons. This code is expected to serve as a boilerplate for developing visual text analytics app using Qlik OSS.
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    Qlik Design Blog

    Building a Visual Text Analytics app using Qlik and Machine Learning techniques ...

    Qlik Full-stack? APIs? Machine Learning?If these topics sounds interesting to you, this series(Part-1 & 2) might be your starting point.Today, we are going to talk about one particular area within Visual Analytics i.e., Visual Text Analytics. This tutorial will focus on the nitty-gritty of this area of research and in my next post, I will do a step-by-step tutorial of how you can actually develop the application. VISUAL TEXT ANALYTICS:With the su... Show More

    Qlik Full-stack? APIs? Machine Learning?

    If these topics sounds interesting to you, this series(Part-1 & 2) might be your starting point.

    Today, we are going to talk about one particular area within Visual Analytics i.e., Visual Text Analytics. This tutorial will focus on the nitty-gritty of this area of research and in my next post, I will do a step-by-step tutorial of how you can actually develop the application.

     

    VISUAL TEXT ANALYTICS:

    With the surge in the generation of digital text on the web in the form of product reviews, descriptions, feedback, etc., there has been a demand for leveraging text mining techniques to understand and analyze these unstructured data. Typically organizations would like to be able to identify patterns, specific keywords(that make an impact), similarities, etc. through text mining. However, the challenge in analyzing hidden patterns from a large noisy text corpora can be huge and at times daunting for analysts. To mitigate the challenge in the discussion, this research area aims to bring text mining, text visualization, and Human-Computer interaction together to make sense of the data.

     

    SOLUTION:

    In the past, I have built a couple of Visual Text Analytics applications using technology stack such as - D3.js, Plotly/Dash, Python Flask(for APIs), etc., and thought it might be interesting to try developing an app using Qlik Sense’s open-sourced solutions. Primarily, for this blog, we will be looking at two of Qlik’s frameworks - Nebula.js and Picasso.js. If you are not aware of them, here is a quick gist:

    Dipankar_Mazumdar_0-1626803624258.png

     

     

    So, what will be building?

    My idea is to build an Exploratory visual analytics app to discover insights from a Cannabis dataset. This will be a full-stack application to analyze the various components such as ‘Effects’, ‘Flavors’, ‘Type of cannabis strains’ and ‘Description’. In this particular dataset, the ‘Description’ field is textual and contains a particular strain’s summary. So, this field will be our focus for the textual analytics part. Below is an example of the ‘Description’ field:

    Strain(A-10): A-10 has an earthy, hashy taste that provides a very heavy body stone. frequently used to treat insomnia and chronic pain.

    To start developing the application, I have designed a high-level architecture to portray the various components involved in building the app. Hopefully, this will give a better picture for our next steps.

    Dipankar_Mazumdar_1-1626803624282.png

     

    We will understand each of these components in details in our next tutorial and see them in action as we finish developing the app.

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    Qlik Design Blog

    Not another Qlik Sense Spotify App - no really!

    This is an interesting and fun way to showcase not only Qlik Sense's Associative Difference and visualization features, but actually shows you a sample flow from problem to solution that we can all relate to; finding that next music track / artist to listen to.
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    Support Updates Blog

    Talk to our Experts about Qlik Sense Mobile and win some Qlik SWAG!

    Hello Qlik Users! Next Tuesday, July 27th at 10 am Eastern we will be having a Talk to Experts Tuesday session on Qlik Sense Mobile! You can register for the event here: Talk to Experts Tuesday: Qlik Sense Mobile Product Manager, @Caique_Zaniolo, will be on the call along with others from Qlik Support, Professional Services and Marketing! You could also win some Qlik SWAG! Join us during the session to find out how. What questions do you have abo... Show More

    Hello Qlik Users!

    Next Tuesday, July 27th at 10 am Eastern we will be having a Talk to Experts Tuesday session on Qlik Sense Mobile! You can register for the event here:

    Talk to Experts Tuesday: Qlik Sense Mobile

    Product Manager, @Caique_Zaniolo, will be on the call along with others from Qlik Support, Professional Services and Marketing!

    You could also win some Qlik SWAG! Join us during the session to find out how.

    What questions do you have about Qlik Sense Mobile? Let me know in the comments below! We hope to see you on the call!

    We hope to see you there!

    Kind regards,

    Qlik Digital Support

    Bonus: the new registration page allows you to register for the August 24th session on Qlik Gold client too!

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    Qlik Education Blog

    Free Workshops: Build Your First Qlik Sense App

    New workshops added in multiple timezones for August and September! Join us for the free, hands-on Build your First Qlik Sense App Workshops hosted by Qlik Education.
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    Qlik Design Blog

    Qlik Sense for Project Portfolio Management

    Happy Tuesday Qlik Community!! This week on the Design Blog I have the pleasure of introducing our newest guest blogger, Lee Matthews. Lee comes to us from the opposite side of the world, well at least from where I am anyway. I mean really, as I get ready for winter he is getting ready for summer.  Lee is a Principal Solution Architect with Qlik and is based in Melbourne, Australia. He joined Qlik in 2011 but has been working in the Business Int... Show More

    332f5e2.jpg

    Happy Tuesday Qlik Community!! This week on the Design Blog I have the pleasure of introducing our newest guest blogger, Lee Matthews. Lee comes to us from the opposite side of the world, well at least from where I am anyway. I mean really, as I get ready for winter he is getting ready for summer.  Lee is a Principal Solution Architect with Qlik and is based in Melbourne, Australia. He joined Qlik in 2011 but has been working in the Business Intelligence field with various ERP and CRM vendors for over 20 years. Prior to that he was a management accountant. He therefore has a long history of working with data and reporting systems for organizations. When not tinkering with Qlik applications for clients, he enjoys tinkering with robots, making things out of wood and teaching these skills to his two boys. We are excited to have your contribution on the Design Blog Lee!

    Effectively managing your projects with Qlik Sense

    As a Solution Architect with Qlik I get the opportunity to work with many different organizations and to show them how Qlik can solve their problems and add value to their business. One common problem I see across larger enterprises is the need to effectively manage projects and to monitor resourcing for those projects. Often the reporting capability of project management systems is limited, or reporting across the entire portfolio of projects is something they are not designed to do.

    This is where Qlik can add great value, in answering questions such as:

    • Which resources are over or under utilized?
    • Are there any project managers or locations that seem to be struggling to deliver successful projects?
    • Are there any projects that should be cancelled, as they are not delivering value?

    Below is a video I created that demonstrates a Project Portfolio Management application while covering many of the unique and powerful capabilities available in Qlik Sense. This application was developed as an example of how you might use Qlik Sense to analyze your entire project portfolio. It takes some concepts and approaches that different clients use in their businesses. Also worth highlighting is that this app uses a custom KPI object developed using the Widgets functionality built into Qlik Sense. Widgets allow you to develop your own visualizations with just a bit of HTML and CSS. You can learn more about Widgets in this quick video primer created by Mike Tarallo here: Qlik Sense 3.0 - Widget

    (I attached this widget for you to play with. If using Qlik Sense Desktop 3.X, just extract the .zip file to your C:\Users\<user_id>\Documents\Qlik\Sense\Extensions directory. Qlik Sense Enterprise Server users will want to use the QMC to import the widget using the Extensions import utility.)

    Regards,

    Lee Matthews

    Qlik

    Using Qlik Sense for Project Portfolio Management

    NOTE: To increase resolution or size of the video, select the YouTube logo in the bottom right of the player. You will be brought directly to YouTube where you can increase the resolution and size of the player window. Look for the 'settings' gears icon in the lower right of the player once at YouTube. If you cannot see the video, you can download the .mp4 file attached to this post.

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    Qlik Design Blog

    Is there really one type of Ad-hoc Reporting with Qlik Sense?

    A question for you all to consider. Is there really one type of Ad-hoc Reporting with Qlik Sense? Read-on to learn how you can "Ad-hoc"  with Qlik Sense!
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    Qlik Academic Program Blog

    Retail challenge for University of Alcalá students

    Yesterday the Qlik Academic Program ran a workshop for students at the University of Alcalá in Spain to get their first experience with Qlik Sense. A group studying for master’s degrees in Data Science and Business Intelligence participated in the hands-on workshop which focused on a case study using Qlik in a fictitious retail company. The Head of Sales, Marketing, IT and the CEO all had questions that they wanted the data to answer, so the stud... Show More

    Yesterday the Qlik Academic Program ran a workshop for students at the University of Alcalá in Spain to get their first experience with Qlik Sense. A group studying for master’s degrees in Data Science and Business Intelligence participated in the hands-on workshop which focused on a case study using Qlik in a fictitious retail company. The Head of Sales, Marketing, IT and the CEO all had questions that they wanted the data to answer, so the students were tasked with creating a Qlik Sense application and story to meet the various stakeholder’s requirements. Also, at the end of the session the students participated in a quick fire Kahoot quiz to test their abilities to make quick discoveries in their data using Qlik Sense.

    For many of the students, this session was their first introduction to Qlik, so they were provided with a written step by step guide to the exercise, plus a live demo by Qlik instructor Sara Del Pino, with support from Laura Gutierrez. These sessions are a great way for students to get practise using Qlik Sense with guidance from experts. Also they are a good opportunity for students to experience the types of requirements that they could face in a business analyst position.

    Did you know that Qlik hosts a Build Your First Qlik Sense App webinar every week? These sessions are completely free of charge, hosted by our brilliant instructors and a great introduction for anyone starting out with Qlik.

    If you are a university student or educator you can also join our Qlik Academic Program for free, to get access to Qlik Sense software, training and qualifications as well as access to our live webinar series. For more information or to sign up visit qlik.com/academicprogram.

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    Support Updates Blog

    New Qlik Patches available this week!

    Hello Qlik Users, On Tuesday, NPrinting May 2021 SR1 released! The patch is on the Qlik download site as well as the Release Notes. As of Wednesday, there are three new Qlik Sense Enterprise on Windows patches available on the Qlik download site: Qlik Sense Patch     May 2021 Patch 4 Release Notes Resolved Defects February 2021 Patch 10 Release Notes Resolved Defects November 2020 Patch 15 Release Notes Resolved De... Show More

    Hello Qlik Users,

    On Tuesday, NPrinting May 2021 SR1 released! The patch is on the Qlik download site as well as the Release Notes.

    As of Wednesday, there are three new Qlik Sense Enterprise on Windows patches available on the Qlik download site:

    Qlik Sense Patch

     

     

    May 2021 Patch 4

    Release Notes

    Resolved Defects

    February 2021 Patch 10

    Release Notes

    Resolved Defects

    November 2020 Patch 15

    Release Notes

    Resolved Defects

     

    A link to an article lists the resolved defects for the corresponding Qlik Sense Enterprise on Windows patch. Release Notes are linked above but can also be found on the Release Notes page here in the Qlik Community.

    Also, I wanted to let you all know there will not be any patches released on July 28th or August 11th. The normal patch schedule will resume on August 25th as will the Qlik Patch Wednesday blog. 

    Be sure to subscribe to the Qlik Support Updates Blog by clicking the green Subscribe button to stay up-to-date with the latest releases. Please give this post a like if you found it helpful and let us know if you have any questions using the comments below.

    Thank you for choosing Qlik!

    Kind Regards,

    Qlik Global Support

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    Qlik Product Innovation Blog

    How To Use NPrinting APIs In A Qlik Load Script

    Task chaining is here! We are delighted to announce that one of the most requested features for Qlik NPrinting is now available with our February 2018 release. If you thought that Qlik NPrinting 17 triggers were only time-based and prevented you from creating event-based dependencies on other Qlik tasks, (such as app and data reloads) then think again. This functionality is now available out-of-the-box using the Qlik NPrinting APIs and a Qlik lo... Show More

    Task chaining is here! We are delighted to announce that one of the most requested features for Qlik NPrinting is now available with our February 2018 release.

    If you thought that Qlik NPrinting 17 triggers were only time-based and prevented you from creating event-based dependencies on other Qlik tasks, (such as app and data reloads) then think again. This functionality is now available out-of-the-box using the Qlik NPrinting APIs and a Qlik load script!

    You can now seamlessly run tasks that represent the typical workflow for a Qlik NPrinting report. Using the publicly available APIs, you can reload Qlik NPrinting connection metadata, update user information and run a publish task, all following a Qlik data and/or app reload.

    You can also institute a poling mechanism to ensure that one task is complete before starting a subsequent one.

    The technical details and examples can be found here: https://community.qlik.com/thread/292037 (even though the example uses Qlik Sense, this can be done just the same in a QlikView load script).

    Please note that this functionality was made possible by the resolution of a bug related to the Qlik REST connector. You will need the REST connector v1.3 which is part of the February 2018 release of Qlik Sense, or it can be downloaded separately and copied over the old REST connector.

    Our long-term vision for reporting involves exposing the Qlik NPrinting tasks in the QMC, however this is a first major step toward integrated scheduling

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    Support Updates Blog

    Retirement of legacy Attunity products on January 31, 2022

    Hello Qlik Users! Based upon alignment to the strategy of the wider Qlik portfolio, Qlik has made the difficult decision to retire:Attunity ConnectRepliweb R1Repliweb MFTRepliweb FastcopyRepliweb RDMVisibilityWe will continue to support these products until the retirement date – January 31, 2022. You can continue to renew your support agreements, through the retirement date. However, renewal support agreements will not go beyond January 31, 2022,... Show More

    Hello Qlik Users!

    Qlik-Logo_TAG_Centered_RGB.png

     Based upon alignment to the strategy of the wider Qlik portfolio, Qlik has made the difficult decision to retire:

    • Attunity Connect
    • Repliweb R1
    • Repliweb MFT
    • Repliweb Fastcopy
    • Repliweb RDM
    • Visibility

    We will continue to support these products until the retirement date – January 31, 2022. You can continue to renew your support agreements, through the retirement date. However, renewal support agreements will not go beyond January 31, 2022, even if this is shorter than your normal support renewal period. Existing support agreements that expire after the retirement date will be honored; these agreements are not eligible for renewal.  

    Support for any additionally purchased licenses will not extend past January 31, 2022. 

    Please contact your Qlik sales representative if you have any questions or let us know in the comments below and we can route them to the appropriate people if necessary. 

    Please subscribe to the Qlik Support Updates Blog by clicking the green ‘Subscribe’ button if you haven’t already. Let us know that you read this post by giving it a like!

    Kind regards,

    Qlik Global Support

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    Qlik Gallery

    Price Monitoring App

    The app was built to monitor price positioning on the market and shows the comparison with other players on the perimeters of interest.
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    Community Manager Blog

    Community Enhancements (2021 - 5)

    Events displayed on forum pages and a refresh to the Academic Program page are the community highlights for the month of July 2021.  Read on for more updates.