25 Replies Latest reply: Dec 1, 2017 10:17 AM by Cheenu Janakiram RSS

    What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?

      Hi,

      What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?

       

      BR,

      Anta

        • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?

          Both are different Products, have a look into the Qlik Sense Support FAQ

           

          What is Qlik Sense Desktop?

          This is the first public release of Qlik Sense. The Desktop edition is what has been referred to as the "Personal Edition" historically.


          more in the FAQ

            • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?

              Hi Daniel,

               

              You said both are different products, QlikView and QlikSense. I tried to get little more details on the differences in the FAQ but i couldn't. Please, help us to understand why there is another product QlikSense when we have QlikView?

                • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?

                  Maybe you should also have a look into the general information about QlikSense

                  http://www.qlik.com/us/explore/products/sense?ga-link=hero

                   

                  QlikSense is different than QlikView and there will be scenarios where QlikView is best and otherwise QlikSense will be best.

                    • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?

                      Daniel,

                      In terms of the product roadmap will QlikSense replace the QlikView Developer Desktop Client and

                      can you provide a matrix showing the benefits/weaknesses of QlikSense and QV developer desktop?

                       

                      Thanks

                      Brian

                        • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?
                          Josh Good

                          HI Brian,

                           

                          QlikView and Qlik Sense are two different products with difference purposes.  QlikView is for guided analytics; Qlik Sense is for self-service visualizations.  Since they have different purposes, one is not intended to replace the other. Qlik intends to continue to invest in both platforms.  At this point, there is not a public roadmap however, I will pass your suggestion along. 

                           

                          The best place to review the benefits of both products is on our website.  Also note that the server version of Qlik Sense will be released in Sept, with additional capabilities.

                           

                          -Josh 

                            • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?

                              Hi Josh,

                               

                              Great. One is not intended to replace others but can't we have both together? or please elaborate in bit detail to understand why we can't have it together?

                               

                              -Vijay

                                • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?
                                  Josh Good

                                  VIjay,

                                   

                                  An organization can absolutely use both. We expect many of our customers will have both.  Sorry I wasn't clear on this point.

                                   

                                  -Josh

                                    • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?

                                      Josh,

                                       

                                      This is where all the confusions. QlikSense appears as a super-set of QlikView. So, it gives me the understanding that i can do whatever i can do with QlikView, and even more as features listed in data sheet, like compulsive collaboration, mobility with agility and so on.

                                       

                                      The reason to have two line of products with respect to Guided Analytics and Self-Service Discovery, may give more insights. Why QlikTech, separated both features instead of combing and providing it in a single product, may help to understand the reason behind to have two line of products.

                                       

                                      Say for example, J2ME intended for mobile java application development where as J2EE for enterprise java application development. It gives the clear understanding why we need to have two different edition of java?

                                       

                                      I think, the key insight is hiding behind Self-Service Discovery and Guided Analytics, it could be the differences in data modeling to allow self-service discovery, or something else. If that comes out, then it's not an issue to understand and accept to look QlikSense and QlikView as different line of products.

                                        • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?
                                          Josh Good

                                          I'm sorry my explination is not clearing thing up for you.  Perhaps the best thing to do is for you to use both product and decide for your self.

                                           

                                          -Josh

                                          • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?
                                            Michael Tarallo

                                            Hello Vijay -- I see you posted the same question from this thread - Self-Service Visualization with QlikSense on QlikCloud - Is it a threat to Developers? - in to this thread, so for continuity purposes - I will re-post - the same response here:

                                             

                                            Your observations are valid. Marketing interpretation is always subjective, so I can understand where you are comin from. At the moment, it has to do with providing choices for different needs in the market. There are different market segments in many industries, including Business Intelligence. These segments comprise of individuals (and organizations) with varying needs and skill sets. Some want quick and easy visualizations they can develop themselves with little help or dependency on others. They also want an easy way to share them or have the ability to work on them together without traditional drawbacks of other desktop and data visualization tools. Some want full custom purpose-built applications. Some want to embed analytics into their own software applications, etc.(APIs)  QlikView and/or Sense - fills these needs. All, eventually, may want secure, controlled and managed environments to serve the masses.

                                             

                                            Here is a quick example and a true story - just to give you an idea.

                                             

                                            My daughter (14) is attending summer classes for her health academy. She had a project where she needed to present "time-trial" data over a 4 week period as well as plot other data points for comparison, etc. Her data was collected in Excel, so she started to use Excel to create charts, and was asking me many questions, that I could not really answer without some research and effort. I stopped her in her tracks ... and said "let's try this" ... and opened up Sense Desktop. I allowed here to start "playing with it" - with very little guidance from me, she was able to quickly create what she needed to answer her questions and have something useful to present to her class.

                                             

                                            Why? - Because it was easy for her skill level to understand. It was fun for her to explore the interface and create what she needed. The visualizations allowed her to interact with the data, and see patterns that would otherwise be missed. The time it took her was minimal. She served herself. Overall she had a good experience - that she will now repeat again for another project, with little help from me - if any.

                                             

                                            I know this is on a small scale, but the point here is that my daughter had little experience with spreadsheet and BI tools - she knew her requirements and was able to apply what she needed using Sense with little training - because of the layout, interface, design etc. Previously she used QlikView for a project in a prior year, thought it was cool - but it was not intuitive for her skill level and did require some hand-holding. Take this experience and apply many times over to groups of individuals and companies whom have similar needs and skill sets and you can see what I mean. Their initial experiences with Sense Desktop will allow them to explore new data, response to new requirements etc. - which then has the potential to evolve into an enterprise, secure and governed deployment of Sense, supporting all the needs of the organization.

                                             

                                            Note as I stated earlier, yes there may be similarities between them - but the approaches people take and the people using them may be different. It's important to remember that this is just the beginning of our next-generation data discovery platform that will continue to evolve and improve over future releases. For example. the way something is done in QlikView today - may be done a better or a different way in Sense. The goals is not  to directly replicate what is in QlikView and put it into Sense. It is to improve and find better and new ways to do the things people need. Smart visualizations, responsive design, data storytelling, data perception - build once deploy anywhere etc. (mobility)

                                             

                                            Also, most importantly (in order to address your question of - providing a single product)- we have over 35,000 QlikView customers - we need to be cognizant of their existing investment and still provide features, support, etc. for the existing product and their applications. As well as allow them them the opportunity to see if Sense could also fit their needs, which they can consider migrating to at the pace they desire, without forcing them to move over  - (unlike I have seen many times with other BI platforms that have released "next-generation" software.)  - Could Sense replace QlikView - and become a single product offering in the future? I do not know the answer to that - that is up for the BI market to decide. Will Sense be able to support the growing needs of organizations just like QlikView has done. In a nutshell .. yes. I have full confidence that it can.

                                             

                                            Regards,

                                             

                                            Mike T

                                              • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?
                                                Mikael Kristensen

                                                It seems like that Sense is as simple as Excel concerning creating graphs etc., so it tries to compete with that product, though being more oriented towards the web and mobile applications ??? (Just guessing).

                                                • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?
                                                  Mark Monfort

                                                  Have to agree with Mike here. I speak of this from first-hand experience having worked for a smaller software vendor that came across the very same thing. We had a well used existing product and developed something new based on customer demand for features and better online interactivity and the concept of 'self-service'. One of the problems we faced was with a potential of cannibalising the existing market of customers and not sure if this will ever be mentioned by Qkik but I'm sure it was a consideration.

                                                   

                                                  Mike is definitely right that there are different types of users in the BI space, those who want something as simple as Sense or those who want something more robust and powerful like Qlikview. I saw this come out and immediately thought of it as a Tableau killer. It's not just the ease of use to build apps from scratch but the fact that the work bench editor makes it so easy for developers like myself to build our own types of charts (look out for a mapping solution we'll come throw up over the next few weeks!) and other features such as utilising HTML5.

                                                   

                                                  I see this as a very strong market response to the growing threat of players like Tableau and a lite-version to boot. The advantage of this is that the market of users can respond and help with the LEAN development that I'm hoping Qlik does.


                                                  I can see customers who want to focus on the data they deliver and want cool features like those available in Sense but cannot afford to spend time learning something non intuitive to create these. Other BI vendors might not necessarily have apps that can do things as easily as Qlik Sense and something like Qlikview falls into that category too.


                                                  Overall, I like the approach Qlik have taken here because it feels like a good strong foundation to build upon. Eventually there might be a merging of the products and I can see features crossing over Qlikview and Sense over the next few years but I think the interesting thing will be seeing how the competitors respond to this. Gotta love competition pushing the boundaries of the industry further and further =)

                                          • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?

                                            THanks Josh.

                                            I didn't see the datasheet, I'll check it out.

                                             

                                            Brian

                                  • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?
                                    Michael Gardner

                                    In my opinion it is the answer to Tableau.  If you import an excel sheet into Tableau and give the user an hour to build visual and meaningful charts you will end up with an application that is somewhat meaningful and visually impressive.  If you then ask them to build the same charts in QlikView, it's not going to happen.

                                     

                                    QlikSense answers that problem for Qlik and provides an Apples to Apples alternative to Tableau.

                                     

                                    Again this is my opinion.

                                    • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?
                                      Neil Gulliver

                                      Hi,

                                      There's a useful blog you could take a look at that provides a bit more of an overview:

                                      http://www.quickintelligence.co.uk/qlik-sense-quick-primer/

                                       

                                      Cheers,

                                      Neil

                                      • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?
                                        basu h

                                        Certainly, Qlik Sense is transforming from QlikView towards achieving goals of Self service BI.

                                        my opinion says it has more drag and drop wizards to develop and build dashboards, It has ready Touch screen, Lasso features to work on hand held devices.

                                          • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?
                                            Scott Beeson

                                            As someone who just discovered Qlik, this is the best answer.  Here is the relevant part of the blog:

                                             

                                            • QlikView is a tool for situations where you want prepared business applications, i.e. applications created by developers who put a lot of thought into the data model, the layout, the charts and the formulae; and deliver the applications to end-users who consume the applications. We call this Guided Analytics. The end-user has total freedom to explore data, select, drill down and navigate in the information, and can this way discover both questions and answers in the data. The end-user is however limited when it comes to creating new visualizations. This type of situation will without doubt be common for many, many years to come.
                                            • Qlik Sense is a tool for situations where you don’t want to pre-can so much. Instead you want the user to have the freedom to create a layout of his own and in it, new visualizations; charts that the developer couldn’t imagine that the user wants to see. You want Self-service data discovery, which means a much more active, modern, engaged user. In addition, Qlik Sense is much easier to use when you have a touch screen, and is adaptive to different screen sizes and form factors. On the whole, Qlik Sense is a much more modern tool.
                                          • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?
                                            Sohail Ansari

                                            That's a good and evolving question. I bet we come across this question by our clients and users quite frequently. There are many answers available on the Internet but then there are real life practical answers that we learn with our experience in the field. I will try to summarize this difference with my personal experience.

                                             

                                            According to Henric Cronström on community:

                                             

                                            QlikView is a tool for situations where you want prepared business applications, i.e. applications created by developers who put a lot of thought into the data model, the layout, the charts and the formulae; and deliver the applications to end-users who consume the applications. We call this Guided Analytics. The end-user has total freedom to explore data, select, drill down and navigate in the information, and can this way discover both questions and answers in the data. The end-user is however limited when it comes to creating new visualizations. This type of situation will without doubt be common for many, many years to come.

                                             

                                            My practical learning points about QlikView:

                                             

                                            • Organizations need to invest in HR expertise for QlikView development
                                            • Organizations need to invest in either in-house or hosted/rented QlikView infrastructure.
                                            • Not available in cloud.
                                            • Licensing is somewhat complicated and a bit expensive in my opinion.
                                            • Easy to use development interface.
                                            • Has some APIs available to integrate QlikView with your existing application and other QV management services.
                                            • The QlikView developer usually goes horizontal across all functional areas of an organization to collect data, bring it at a single place and design a data model for Qlik to consume. (Can leverage an existing ETL process and/or Data warehouse as well)
                                            • Many data connectors available to connect with a variety of data sources.
                                            • The QlikView dashboard development process works pretty much like any other software development methodology but I have mostly witnessed Agile methodology.
                                            • The QlikView dashboard building time is usually much more faster compare to any other type of software development.
                                            • The end user receives the ready to use product and immediately get the results required for B.I. Analysis.
                                            • In this case, the "Self Service" B.I. plays a small role. (Requires Power users/trained users)
                                            • The in-memory associative data model is amazing and beyond comparison.
                                            • Once you model the data properly, it can be used for QlikSense as well.
                                            • Offers much more control to developers over design and control of the visualizations.
                                            • Has C++ and C# in its roots
                                            • Mobile friendly with little effort
                                            • Mobile App available
                                            • Allows external branded reporting using it's tool called NPrinting.
                                            • Some pre-build extensions are available to use. However, you can also build your own extensions
                                            • Both QlikView and QlikSense environment can exist side by side.

                                             

                                             

                                            Again as per Henric Cronström on community:

                                             

                                            QlikSense is a tool for situations where you don’t want to pre-can so much. Instead you want the user to have the freedom to create a layout of his own and in it, new visualizations; charts that the developer couldn’t imagine that the user wants to see. You want Self-service data discovery, which means a much more active, modern, engaged user. In addition, Qlik Sense is much easier to use when you have a touch screen, and is adaptive to different screen sizes and form factors. On the whole, Qlik Sense is a much more modern tool.

                                             

                                            My practical learning points about QlikSense:

                                             

                                            • QlikSense was introduced mainly with the idea of providing "freedom" to the end user to perform "Self Service' B.I. on their data. You give a data set (mostly Excel sheet) to end user and the user should be able to import and start making some visualizations and dashboard on its own. It's that simple. You can say it's Excel on steroids.
                                            • Does that mean you do not need QlikSense expert developers? No, the end user is mostly non-technical and does not know the in and out of data modeling or how to write efficient KPI formulas. For a small set of data, an end user can probably find their answers by doing self-service B.I. But when it comes to multitude of data sets, their size, sources, procurement, relationships, creating schemas, facts/measures, optimization, set analysis, speed, cross functional data, security and many other factors, you again see the need to bring in a QlikSense expert who can again provide you some "Guided Analytics" on this "Self Service" tool.
                                            • Organizations usually want to perform data analysis across their entire sets of data to find the patterns, trends & cross relationships. If every manager starts doing their own analysis there is a very high chance that they will be building their own B.I data sources and most likely will be coming up with different numbers for the same KPIs. And we know that management hate to come to this point. Therefore, bringing in experts make total sense in order to march towards single source of truth for the company.
                                            • In my opinion, the "Self Service" tag with QlikSense is mostly because to show it's simplicity to use. But as you start working with it, you will soon realize that you can make most use of it by putting an expert to it.
                                            • Many data connectors available to connect with a variety of data sources.
                                            • Easy drag and drop interface.
                                            • Licensing is simpler as compare to QlikView
                                            • Cloud option is available; therefore infrastructure cost can be minimized.
                                            • Uses the same power of in-memory associative data model.
                                            • The Control offered to developers over design and control of the visualizations is not as good as QlikView. This is good for a simple end user as they do not like too much customization but it gives frustration to the developers specially who are coming from QV background.
                                            • Many supporting APIs are available for developers for integration and other purposes.
                                            • Has Javascript and HTML5 in its roots
                                            • Highly mobile friendly
                                            • Mobile App available
                                            • Allows external branded reporting using it's tool called NPrinting.
                                            • A lot of third party extension are available to use. However, the problem I see with using extensions is the maintenance. As you upgrade QlikSense you got to be careful about extensions support for the new version. Many extension developers made them as their hobby, therefore support can become an issue for these kind of extensions. However, you can also build your own extensions if you want to go that route.
                                            • QlikSense is catching up fast with QlikView features and even beyond. It is improving with every new release. I believe there are couple of releases every year.
                                            • Both QlikView and QlikSense environment can exist side by side.
                                            • I have a feeling that Qlik as a company is focusing more on QlikSense vs QlikView (again this is just my opinion)

                                             

                                            Please feel free to correct/update any of these observations.

                                            • Re: What is difference between Qlik Sense & QV Desktop client?
                                              Cheenu Janakiram

                                              Hi everyone,

                                               

                                              Although question was marked as answered, this is my 2 cents worth in terms of my experience with View, Sense and ultimately QAP.

                                              Firstly, QlikView is C++/C# based and makes integration with web components at best, difficult. Workbench is not a great tool and is not easy to use. Sense is moving away from this C++/C# 'limitation', as further explained below.

                                              On the other hand, as most people post here, QlikView is more suited to 'guided' BI as opposed to self-serve. The Sense UI makes self-serve much easier (as in Mike Tarallo's example). Even though collaboration tools allow 'users' to create their own objects in a View (server) app, it is not a user-friendly GUI and alternatively QlikView desktop is much more adapted to 'experts' as opposed to someone picking it up by themselves and trying quickly to put some charts together. Sense has a much easier UI for DIY within a published application or even Sense desktop.

                                               

                                              I think my perspective of Sense vs View, comes from what I have experienced and implemented in Sense mashups. The following below list is a set of reasons why I think the Sense platform is the right choice for the future and Qlik developing as a company overall in a very competitive market.

                                               

                                              One notion I use as an underlying observation is also required at this point. When looking at BI, the DIKW hierarchy/pyramid lacks one aspect that seems to only be implied in the definition of BI itself. BI is supposed to allow 'fact-based' decision-making and this is why some organisations involve a 5th step in this hierarchy/pyramid: 'action', turning the decision-making into concrete operational actions. However, with View this requires to a great extent to doing the analysis from Qlik (AccessPoint Qlik application) and implementing the 'action' steps or anything else in a different platform (typically a web-oriented platform for the lack of a better term), i.e. taking 'action' in a different environment.

                                               

                                              To me, the Qlik 'magic sauce' is in the data model and data cloud. A lot of 'energy' and time has been spent on lists/checks on "which BI platform is better and why?", typically from the front-end perspective.

                                              Qlik demarcates itself from other products in the manner in which it handles the data model and the way one can since v8.5/9 "leverage" the 'symbol table' with 'set analysis'. (Check this article which is superb in explaining this 'magic sauce': http://www.dbms2.com/2010/06/12/the-underlying-technology-of-qlikview/)

                                              I know I might be taking a 'wild step' and say things that are not 100% verified or true, but as far as I know, Qlik feels like it was created by someone who did a lot of data analysis and was just sick and tired of the "clunky" way in which to build a 'data model' in anything that is SQL- or cube-based. The joins are tedious, transformations are subject to being in the right place with multiple parentheses encasing clauses. A nightmare to code and not 'easy' to edit/change/scale. Furthermore, the green-white-grey is a 'silver bullet' and pure genius from a 'data analysis' perspective and also a great boon for data modelling and Qlik developers for their 'ground work'. There have been an innumerate amount of times I wsa 'business expert' for clients just because I had their data and loaded it into QlikView with a whole set of barely anything else but ListBoxes.

                                               

                                              The 2 above points being said, below are the reasons why I think Sense is a smart move from a Qlik organisational perspective.

                                               

                                              • With Sense (and QAP) importance is given to the way Qlik handles the data model which is ultimately the 'magic sauce' and the product differentiator. The front-end can be anything you want, Sense Hub or web mashups.
                                              • Capability APIs and mashups makes Qlik easily accessible to web developers in a language and format they are familiar with (JavaScript). Web developers are a much larger crowd than Qlik developers.
                                              • Engine APIs allows configuration of extremely intelligent and customised implementations (e.g. creating apps on the fly which would allow for more apps to be delivered to more clients (BIaaS), without having concurrency of 'unused' apps which would all take memory resources on 'normal' servers. Sample video of this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2yqfNsQ8JY)
                                              • Visualisations objects have been opened to D3 and angular and the birth of Qlik Branch community has allowed the quick development of the amount of visualisations available and easily implementable for Qlik clients/users (yes, versioning might be an issue, but I'll pass on that discussion here).
                                              • Via hypercubes, it will be easier to leverage external APIs and access external data without having to extract and store external data. Here is a good video explaining how this would work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43GwNbJ_YBY.
                                              • QAP server makes sense for 'larger' deployments of Qlik without having the (linear) 'pricing' issue long having been the conversation of threads of discussion and being the main client complaint. For what would be approx. 750+ users, QAP pricing starts making much more sense as pricing is 'core-based' making it more "acceptable" in a "large-scale"/enterprise solution.
                                              • Ultimately, developing on the thought of 'action' further above, mashups and using Qlik in the 'background' to handle the data and rendering the analytics via mashups allows for much greater enrichment (also forBI-related 'data entry') and creating an interface where BI/Analytics is a true working tool - something in the vein of 'in-memory' ERP, where the BI/analytics is merging with the workflow.

                                               

                                              I would be glad to hear thoughts on the above. From a Qlik developers perspective, I think they will always be required from a data modelling and systems (admin) perspective, but need to skill up for the change in technology.