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Qlik Design Blog

43 Posts authored by: Arturo Muñoz

A few weeks ago, we got into a new project to create an interactive piece with the Canadian media, National Post. The goal was to illustrate the donations candidates of the Conservative Leadership Race received from the start of the race through March 2017. Qlik Sense was integrated with Qlik GeoAnalytics to visualize where the donations were coming from and which candidates received the most donations in each area.

 

The map below was one of our first tries, we decided to use color to illustrate the top candidate by amount collected, and by postal code.

 

1.png

 

Problem with this approach appeared obvious at a first glance, postal codes areas have an insane size variance, regions such as the northern and barely populated province of Nunavut extents thousands of square miles in just one postal code while postal areas in urban zones, such as in Toronto, span a few city blocks and are hidden in the map.

 

So, how to make Nunavut and Toronto visible and comparable?

 

We decided to apply a binning operation to our data to solve most of the issues described. Qlik GeoAnalytics has a wizard that lets you chose operation, making the process seamless. The result is a new table containing squares (or hexagons) geo-polygons.

 

6.png

 

 

Conservative.gif

 

In this new map version, readers can compare areas easily without the distortion introduced by the different postal code sizes, letting us to see what’s going on in Toronto and in Nunavut at the same time.

 

We've added some extra cool features to the resulting Qlik Mashup. I recommend you to visit it and explore it at http://news.nationalpost.com/news/qlik

 

Enjoy,

AMZ

A few days ago I stumbled upon one of those little tricks that we all love. Roland Vecera came up with a nice solution to bring minicharts to Qlik Sense. It can help us to increase app data density and make our Qlik Sense tables sexy and informative again. Don't forget to add this to your bookmarks!


example.png


In Roland's blog post you will find instructions about how to build a linear gauge, a traffic light gauge, and even whiskers minicharts (right table in the image above),


I particularly like the linear gauge, with this technique we can now simulate small bars that goes along with each one of the table dimension items. The expression used to create the linear gauge 'bar chart' is actually reusable and very simple, looks like this:


repeat('█', rangemax(rangemin( ceil(((column(1)/column(2))-1)*10),10),1) )


The expression will paint a variable number of solid blocks █ based on a given calculation that is evaluated by row. By now you should have a nice grey bar from 1 to 10 blocks.


Next (optional) step is to apply color to it. You could add color based on any criteria you want, in the chosen example Roland is using color in the same way as he use size, both display Growth.


The text color expression looks like this in the example:

 

if(expression>2, argb(255,0,150,0),

     if(expression>1, argb(255,0,200,0),

         if(expression>0.5, yellow(),lightred())))

 

Where expression will be the same expression as in Growth column (Steigerung).

 

You can read more about minichars in tables trick at QlikView + Qlik Sense Blog von Heldendaten: Qlik Sense Calendar Measures & "Minicharts" in Tabellen

 

Hope you like it.

AMZ


PS: For those of you who can't read German and/or use Google translator, please check out this community doc Creating Mini Chart in Qlik Sense tables (it also contains some hacks to make this trick even more complete)

It’s been a while since the last time we covered an extension in this blog, this time I would like to introduce ColorStyler by Johannes Sunden jsn .

 

Map_GradientTheme.png

 

 

The reason I found ColorStyler very special, besides its obvious value, is due the way this extension was built. It’s half an extension half a mashup or should I rephrase it as a “mashup that extends your Qlik Sense app”.

 

ColorStyler as you might have figured out by now is a coloring extension, it will let you preview and apply different color schemes to your charts, no coding is required, it will take care of the not-so-easy task of creating a ColorMix expression for you.

 

Once installed in your computer, ColorStyler sets up a mashup that will let you interact with the available apps and apply some color options to your charts.

 

To start working with ColorStyler you must pick an app from a list of your available Qlik Sense apps, then you will be presented with a list of available visualizations (as of today it only loads Master Items), and finally ColorStyler will offer you four main color categories to pick from.

 

I find very useful the gradient options, and especially gradient themes, it’s a good selection of nice and safe colors palettes. If you are not happy with the proposed themes you can always create your own by defining the gradient colors.

 

It’s quite interesting to see the chart update on real-time and compare how different color alternatives affect to our ability to read the visualization. Once you’re happy with your color selection you just need to “Save Changes” to make it persistent not only in the mashup but in the actual Qlik Sense app.


As I mentioned before,ColorStyler will only let you interact with Master Visualizations from your Qlik Master Items library so you must have at least one master object in your app to be able to use this tool. After applying color to your master item, you can edit it as normal in your Qlik Sense client and copy the generated expression (ColorMix1 or ColorMix2) and then apply it to any other visualization.


Note: I would recommend to be extra careful when applying colors to charts by dimension, it’s very important to use color with care, just remember color in data visualization should be used to convey information, and not as decoration. Also, is very important to make sure that a dimension chosen color will be applied consistently across your app, avoiding situations where the same dimension value has two different colors in two charts.


For latest version and technical questions please check Qlik Branch project page: Qlik Branch

 

If you prefer to watch a video instead:

 

NOTE: To increase resolution or size of the video, select the YouTube logo at the bottom right of the player. You will be brought directly to YouTube where you can increase the resolution and size of the player window. Look for the 'settings' gears icon in the lower right of the player once at YouTube.

 

What

Just that, a mashup template for dev-hub (aka dead simple drag and drop mashup creator) that ships with a bunch of cool features such as:

 

  • Dev-hub ready
  • Multi Page
  • KPI row built in
  • Prebuilt CSS color library
  • Cards with full screen toggle
  • Offcanvas filters pane
  • Help modal popup
  • Responsive design
  • Bootstrap built in
  • Custom fonts ready

 

Why

Because we’ve heard you asking for a more powerful and good-looking template that can constitute a solid framework to create your customized mashups.

 

Who

Anyone looking for a feature rich mashup template designed for use in the dev-hub.

 

When

Available today!

 

Where

You can grab the latest* version here GitHub - fkabinoff/qs-dev-hub-dashboard-template: Dashboard template for Qlik Sense dev hub

 

*Please notice this is a live project, we will keep updating it frequently. Right now the project documentation (readme.md) is far from what we would like it to be.

Qlik Explorer for Developers (QEfD) is a tool that will let you to explore Qlik Sense content and obtain some valuable info. You can connect to a Qlik Sense server and drag and drop code snippets and IDs into whichever IDE you are using to build mashups or similar solutions.

 

You can learn more about QEfD here:

    Qlik Explorer for Developers is here!

 

I mainly use QEfD for two tasks, to obtain objects ID so I can inject them into my webpage, and eventually to poke around object properties.

 

QEfD.PNG

 

To copy an object ID I just connect it to my server (you can also try it with your localhost:4848 or just try out the default connection to PlayGround) and then QEfD will show me a tree-list with all the apps available on that server. From there it gets pretty simple, navigate to the object I want to incorporate into my webpage, the preview tab gets very helpful to double check you are where you want to be, and then using a template* called "id" I can copy the object’s ID.


*What’s a template: is a set of code snippets which are bound to different nodes in Qlik Sense. A node is for instance a Qlik Sense application, a sheet or an object.

 

Since the introduction of the Visualization API a developer can create her own charts on-the-fly, this way we become independent from the Qlik Sense client and from the visualization layer within the qvf (you don’t have to create a chart first on Sense client).


To create your own charts, you are supposed to construct the object by yourself. QEfD can be super handy here. I use it to learn, and let’s face it, to copy all JSON properties from existing objects. It makes it super easy to create some pretty advanced on-the-fly charts. It almost feels like cheating, in a good way.


If you want to download now Qlik Explorer for Developers, please do it here:

Download Qlik Explorer for Developers

Built by Developers for Developers


If you want to see QEfD in action, please check out this video:

    Qlik Analytics plugin for Visual Studio - YouTube

    Please note that this stand alone tool works exactly as the Qlik Analytics for Visual Studio plugin.


Enjoy it!

AMZ

2016 is almost over, we've made it this far; we can make it through one more day. To help you to reduce the end-of-year stress nothing better than our very own top blog posts of the year. Let's start by sharing some numbers.

 

7 author posted 77 articles (not including this one) during the year, and a total of 34,876 words (6.693 distinct words) were written. Last year we wrote the Q-word 323 times while this year the word “Qlik” appears 366 times in our articles, 4.75 times per post. You helped us to improve our content by commenting in average almost 7 times per post, a total of 531 comments were written.

 

Most popular posts in 2016

 

Most read/visited posts

Top selling posts.

 

Set Analysis in the Aggr function.

The sortable Aggr function is finally here.

AutoGenerate your data.

Five Qlik Sense extensions you should check out today.

Creating a KPI object in QlikView.

 

Most commented posts of the year

Something is going on in these posts.

 

The sortable Aggr function is finally here.

Qlik Sense 2.2 – It just keeps getting better and better.

Creating a KPI object in QlikView.

Full Accumulation example.

Autonumber function.

 

The underdogs 2016

They worth a second read.

 

Recipe for a Pareto Analysis – Revisited 
When I first wrote about the new sortable aggr function I was really curious to see what uses were unlocked by the new functionality. HIC found one.

Implicit Set Operators
Quite popular post that didn't make it to our top 5. It's a good lecture to improve your set analysis skills.

Use case for ValueList Chart function
Real life use case for a no-so-common function

Qlik Lars Mashup project template
If you are considering creating a mashup page with Qlik charts in it, you may want to check out this template.

 

 

Hope you all have a great end of the year!

AMZ

Not that long ago, with the release of Qlik Sense 3.0, Qlik Sense introduced the Time-aware charts. Line charts are now able to intelligently zoom in and out when used in conjunction with a date/time dimension letting us explore the data in a very smart way.


Please check this post for further details: https://community.qlik.com/blogs/qlikviewdesignblog/2016/07/15/what-s-new-in-qlik-sense-30-time-aware-charts

 

Now with the release of Qlik Sense 3.1 SR2 (Qlik Sense 3.1 Service Release 3 now available, Information on Sense Desktop 3.1.1 expiry) the Time-aware feature has made it to the bar and the combo charts as well. This new feature will expand the capabilities of two of the most common charts in our library.

 

To get a working time-aware bar or combo chart in your app you just need to make sure you are running Qlik Sense 3.1 SR2 or higher, then modify an existing bar (combo) chart or create a new one, remember you should be using a time field as the dimension for your chart. Finally you need to activate the continuous axis in the chart properties panel as shown in the animation below.

 

 

timeaware660.gif

 

 

AMZ

Stacked bar charts are perfect to represent the contribution of particular elements to the total, the classic example is Sales by Year and by Quarter.

 

1.png

 

Just by observing the chart a few seconds we can conclude that Actual Amount was higher in 2007 than 2006, and it seems clear that Q2 rise in 2007 contributed significantly to the 2007 total increase in Actual Amount.

 

To create a simple stacked bar chart like the one in our example we've needed 2 dimensions (Year and Quarter) and one measure. Alternatively, we could recreate the chart using one single dimension "Year" and 4 expressions one per each one of the quarters. The procedure to customize the colors will depend of what type of chart you have, bi-dimensional chart or multi-expression chart, let’s start with bi-dimensional chart coloring.

 

Bi-dimensional stacked bar chart

 

This is the simplest case, you just need to target each one of the segments (Quarters in our example) by name, you could just use an if statement to target them, something like:

 

if(Quarter='Q1',red(),if(Quarter='Q2',blue(), if(Quarter='Q3', green(), yellow())))

















 

Alternatively, you could use conditional functions for a more elegant approach:

 

pick(match(Quarter,'Q1','Q2','Q3','Q4'),red(),blue(),green(),yellow())

















 

 

2.png

 

 

Multi-expression stacked bar chart

 

In this scenario our data table contains one column per quarter as in the image below but we still want to represent them in one stacked chart using custom colors.

 

3.png

 

We could get a stacked bar chart using one single dimension "Year", and 4 expressions Q1,Q2, Q3 and Q4. The problem comes when trying to color the segments, at this point we can’t target specific segments anymore because each one of our segments is made of an expression.

 

To solve this situation, we need to work-around our chart to make it again bi-dimensional. In order to do that we’ll add a new table to our data model. Our table will contain the name of the segments for our chart, I called it [segment names] in my example.

 

4.png

 

Once the data has been loaded then it’s time to create our chart. The dimensions will be “Year” and the recently created “measure”. To complete our chart, we’ll need to add a simple if statement (or the more elegant pick&match combo) in our measure expression, similar to this one:

 

if(measure='Q1', sum(Q1),
if(measure='Q2', sum(Q2),
if(measure='Q3', sum(Q3),
if(measure='Q4', sum(Q4)))))


 

Now that our chart is standard bi-dimensional bar chart, all we need to do is to apply custom colors as described earlier in this post. So again we could use the good old if statement or pick&match to end up having customized segment colors in our stacked bar chart.

 

6.PNG

 

I'm attaching an example app so you can check how it's done.

 

I want to give credits to all the contributors to How to use custom colours in a stacked bar chart, please check that community thread if you have questions or just to learn more about custom colors in stacked bar charts.

 

AMZ

Arturo Muñoz

Cardifi...what?

Posted by Arturo Muñoz Oct 7, 2016

“Cardification” might not be one of the shiniest new features in Qlik Sense 3.1 but it’s an important step towards something bigger*.

 

For me, and I guess for some of you as well, one of the challenges when it comes to create a nice looking new app appears when composing a multi-object sheet in Qlik Sense. My struggles are related with the fact that the objects have no borders (thank you nordic minimalism) making it hard to distinguish where an object ends and the following starts.

 

To overcome that challenge some of us opted for leaving empty columns and/or rows to separate the app contents. For example to make a "cut" between the filters and the main charts.

 

Sales Discovery app is a good example of this. As you can see in the example below, we are leaving some breathing space to separate some areas within the app.

 

example.jpg

 

This method works just fine for me most of the time, and it has let me to compose complex layouts without any further issues. However, one of the most obvious disadvantages of leaving empty columns or/and rows is that we are losing precious pixels that in some cases could have made a great difference to display data properly.

 

Another approach commonly used to separate content consists in using a Text & Image object and then a background image containing a single line, making it look like a divider. It works OK when in a desktop-like device but it will force me to keep an unnecessary object when in a mobile device plus it doesn't solve any of the issues described before.

 

To ease our pains Qlik Sense 3.1 includes the so-called “cardification” feature. It's a theme (yes a *theme) called Qlik-Standard. It changes the aspect of your app by adding a nice light gray background, a border, and a lovely subtle padding to the objects. Although I’m not completely abandoning the idea of eventually using white space in my apps, or even the Qlik-Classic theme, this new theme will streamline the process of making my apps look nicer and to be more readable and digestible.

 

Please see the example below to discover how to activate it.

 

cadificationv2.gif

 

Extra tip: Once you have expanded the app options panel at the very top of your screen you may want to check out the color picker under sheet title styling section

 

So, do you think you will be using this new theme in your apps?

 

AMZ

We all can agree on the fact that not all the data contained in an app is equally important, right? The most important data should be highly visible and be located in a prime location within your app. Is always interesting to recheck Michael Anthony’s post about hierarchy.

 

KPIs are one of those elements that for sure will be at the very top of your app's first sheet, it's something you don’t want anyone to miss.

 

Since we don’t have a KPI object in QlikView’s objects library, all of us have came up with different solutions and tricks to represent a value and some contextual information next to it. All of them have one common aspect, they require several text objects to look good. This is usually ok, is not that hard to achieve a nice looking KPI using multiple text objects, but it can be really tedious to maintain.

 

The object below shows an example of a KPI representing net sales, it also contains other key contextual information such as comparison vs previous year and comparison vs target. The KPI also includes graphical indicators that will let us know if the measured indicator is performing good or bad based on our goals.

 

pic1.jpg

 

It looks really neat but in order to achieve something like that in QlikView you will need to create and maintain a good amount of text objects as you can see.

 

Today we introduce yet another alternative to text objects, it's a really smart, sexy looking, and easy-to-manage KPI object. And it’s all done using only one object! Let’s see how it’s done.


pic3.png


Each one of those three KPI objects are in fact a gauge chart heavily tweaked to look like a completely new KPI object. To do so you need to remove the gauge image in the gauge chart and add some text boxes as “Text in Chart”. Good news is, it all belongs to the same object now so you will be able to move it around without missing any part.


My very favorite piece of this method is the flexibility obtained by using variables to modify each one of the moving parts that form the object making it a piece of cake to maintain. Next, I’m including a diagram of the object so you can get a better understanding of it.


pic2.jpg

PROS:

  • Simplified administration.
  • Global configuration options = unified look&feel.
  • Manageability, no more loose parts when moving/copying objects across sheets.
  • Minor tweaks to replicate across projects.

 

CONS:

  • It might be a bit confusing for newbies due the intensive use of variables.


I’m attaching an app (qvw) so you can just copy and paste it to your new project and explore how it's done.


Enjoy it!

AMZ


PS: All kudos must go to Rasmus Andersson and Alexander Mosquera alexmosq at Mindcamp and Fredrik Thomsen and Peter Wedebrant @Qlik.


Creating a reliable data model becomes in one of the key factors to a successful project, data visualization, chart, dashboard, or report. Quite a few times creating an effective model is not the easiest task to perform due several reasons, poor data quality, or unstructured data sources, etc.

 

Even when we have a pristine normalized data model we may face some issues on how to associate our data easily.

 

To help us with the crucial mission of managing data associations from multiples sources and building a great data model Qlik Sense 3.0 (sorry QlikView fans) release included the so called "bubbles" feature.

 

How it works?

 

All this works through Qlik Data Manager, when more than one table is loaded we can access to the association's view where a circle or a bubble symbolizes each one of the loaded tables. The size of the bubble represents the table’s size so the larger the bubble the more rows of data it contains.

 

The fun part is to interact with the bubbles, you can click one and explore its contents, or you could click and press on a bubble and see how Qlik Sense will recommend you possible associations using color coding. Highly recommended associations are marked with green, and medium recommendations are orange.


To confirm an association you just need to drag one bubble to another table and see the magic happen. It not only will capture and match the column with identical names but it will also scan the data content to suggest you with the best possible link.


Untitled.gif


If you want to get more control you can always edit or break the suggested associations and use your criteria to set up a custom association. Alternatively users can let Qlik Sense create associations between all added data tables according to recommendations based on data analysis by clicking on the magic stick icon.


Once you’re happy with your data model just press on Load Data button and you’re good to go.


For a more comprehensive demo and demo sample files please check out Michael Tarallo material here.


Enjoy Qliking

AMZ

One of my personal favs and long time awaited features that ships with Qlik Sense 3.0 is the new time-aware charts.

 

We could simply describe it as continuous scale in x-axis line chart but it’s much more than that, let me show it to you.

 

Before the introduction of Qlik Sense 3.0 Time-aware charts, line charts displaying a time dimension in the X-axis would show a portion of the line at a reasonable scale although the complete sequence was still visible in the mini-chart at the bottom of the object.

 

time-aware.gif

 

Time-aware charts are visualizations that use a continuous scale to provide a complete and accurate view of time-based data. That is, when you enable continuous scaling on the x-axis in a chart with date fields, data points are separated from each other by a distance relative to their associated time. As well, the axis labels are evenly separated whether or not there is data for that point and the chart view is compressed to avoid scrolling.

 

You can zoom in, zoom out or modify the size of the visible window that appears over the mini-chart at the bottom of the object to get a closer look into the data. As you can see in the animation above, content gets immediately adjusted showing the relevant x-axes label information at any zoom level.

 

selections.gif

 

Selections are smart as well, when browsing the chart at a yearly level any selection in the chart will perform a selection in the year derived field, but when a more detailed view of the data is visible, for example at day level, selections will be performed in day (derived) field in the data model.

 

How to get it working?

 

Time-aware charts needs, of course, a time dimension to work. Good thing is since Qlik Sense 1.1 we can declare and derive time fields in our data model. Read Jennell’s blog post to learn how to do it. Alternatively, if you are loading data using the data load wizard, then chances are Qlik Sense will automatically detect your field(s) containing a date and it will do the rest for you.

 

Once you have your time dimension working the next step will be pretty straightforward, as shown in the animation above you just need to activate it by checking the box “Use continuous scale”.

 

Thanks,

Arturo

The introduction of Qlik Sense APIs provided us with a flexible toolset to build, extend, and combine Qlik Sense with other technologies. The Qlik Sense APIs enable data to be freely exchanged between Qlik Sense and any web application, which means developers can build true data mashups with any web services or third-party library.

 

If you are interested in understanding more in detail how the APIs work please check Qlik Sense Developers help and Francis or Yianni posts in this blog.

 

I’d like to show you some of the most recent projects we have been involved in that may motivate you to try out the Qlik Sense APIs.

 

Refugees’ journey in Europe

 

We partnered with The Telegraph to create a visualization that tries to help to answer questions such as, how many refugees are coming into Europe and what route do they take. The visualization piece is embedded as a part of a larger article at their online site.

 

Telegraph.png

 

See it live here.

 

Visualizing survey data

 

We have worked on several surveys data visualization projects during the last months but I will pick two examples and I'm sure you will get the idea.

 

We built interactive pieces for their survey’s data adding the power of the associative engine to the survey's responses making it much more interesting, allowing us to filter the resultset to our particular interests.

 

The Economist.png

 

The Economist. Unique selling points. See it live here.

Forbes Insights. The agile, data-driven company. See it live here.

 

Which Airline is best for you

 

"When you’re buying a plane ticket, there’s a lot to consider: how much it costs, what time the flight leaves, whether there’s a layover—and which airline to fly." That's how Time Magazine introduced this piece that will help us, based on our own criterias, discover which airline fits you better.

 

Time Magazine.png

 

 

See it live here.

 

I hope you like these examples.

AMZ

The requirements

 

During the last few days I’ve been working in a new project around weather data, we wanted to visually represent how temperatures had risen during the last decades. We have a bunch of temperature data points gathered at weather stations across the globe. We were curious to check if a map would help us to visualize warming, we wanted to check whether or not the global warming is indeed global. Are the co2 emissions affecting more to the northern hemisphere? Are some continents/countries more affected?

 

The data issue

 

Qlik Sense provides with a compelling mapping object out-of-the box that would help us to geographically understand the data. However, in order to get the map object to work, it needs a latitude and longitude geo point to be able to represent the data. In this particular case we had address data of each one of the weather stations where the measurement were taken but we didn’t have geo points or any other geo reference.

 

The solution

 

Luckily we have a bunch of smart guys in the community that can help us all to solve most of our issues. GetGeoCoords is a Qlik Sense app created by Christof Schwarz( cschwarz) that does exactly what I needed. It will enrich my app by not only adding latitude and longitude data points to each one of the existing locations, but it will also include some other useful geo-information like country, state, county, district, neighborhood, city, etc.

 

Screenshot 2016-02-17 18.50.34.png

 

Christof describes the app as following:

The main purpose of the app is to stand in the middle of data loads, it inputs tables and outputs files. So you likely don't need the frontend unless you like to make sanity checks of your geographic data, You may also be creative and take the code into your own final app to avoid one load sequence in the middle. My code would work in other apps as well.

 

You can grab the app here and learn how it works watching the video tutorial

 

Hope you find it as useful as I do.

 

AMZ

 

PS: Just a friendly reminder about app support. As most of the community based content this material comes with no support but the support provided by the community itself.

It’s been a little bit over a year since last time I posted about extensions here so I thought it would be nice to update this topic with fresh extensions submitted to our developer community Qlik Branch. Remember you can submit, contribute to others, and download extensions from Qlik Branch.

 

My favorite 5 extensions (as of April, 2016)

 

1. qsVariable by erikwett

 

qsVariable.png

qsVariable is a super useful UI variable handler. The extension will let you not only create a variable while you set it up but also it will let you add a UI layer (buttons, selectors, input fields and sliders) so users can interact with your variable(s).


2. Qlik Sense Trellis Chart by agilos.mla

 

Trellis.jpg


Trellis or more commonly known as Small Multiples (by Edward Tufte) is one of the well-known techniques available to represent the same measure across two dimensions. It’s especially useful when it comes to compare values in across charts using the same scale.

 

The extension uses the power of D3 to represent the data letting you to pick from pie, bar, or line chart. At this point the extension still needs some work to make it mobile friendly but it's a very promising starting point.

 

3 Simple KPI by alex.nerush

 

SimpleKPIDemo.png

 

Simple KPI is all about flexibility and options, it's a great example of how customizable an extension can be. Simple KPI will let you create your very own style KPI object adding dimensions, setting up conditional colors and fonts and many more options. Give it a try

 

4 Measure Builder by LorisLombardo87

 

68747470733a2f2f7261772e6769746875622e636f6d2f4c6f7269734c6f6d626172646f38372f4d6561737572652d4275696c6465722f6d61737465722f696d672f3364656d6f2e676966

 

Creating complex expressions is sometimes a bit tricky, especially for new users so any help can make a difference. Measure Builder is a wizard style editor extension that will let users to create expressions easily by just simple completing a step by step form in a very visual way. It's really helpful to understand and learn set analysis syntax so if you are new to Qlik I would always recommend you to get this one installed on your computer.

 

 

5 Circular KPI by JSN


CircularKPI_animation2.gif


Would you like to use KPI to show target achievements but your values typically are over 100% making classic progress bar useless? Well, then you may want to try Circular KPIs, it supports percentage (%) KPIs up to 300% in a very smart way. Simple but fun extension.

 

If you are using any other extension that you think may be worth it to share with the community please let us all know in the comment section!

 

Enjoy Qliking!

AMZ

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